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Robert Robison McCandliss Diary

  • Collection
  • 1863-1865

This Civil War era pocket diary and account book records the daily life and finances of 110th Ohio Volunteer Infantry surgeon Dr. Robert Robison McCandliss (1826-1908) from May-December 1863. It  includes Major General Horatio G. Wright's 1865 letter authorizing McCandliss to administer  to the wounded during the final days of the war.
Born in Warren County, Ohio, Dr. McCandliss enlisted in the Union Army as a medical officer on 25 August 1862. Along with his wife, Priscilla (née Youart),  and two orderlies, he rode with the 110th Ohio Volunteers in an ambulance. Surrounded by Confederate troops during the Battle of Winchester, the surgeon, his wife and hundreds of others were taken as prisoners. McCandliss was ultimately incarcerated in Libby Prison, his wife in Castle Thunder.
The diary's entries cover a wide range of topics, including the daily life of a medical officer in the Union Army, personal relationships, regiment fatalities, and brief mentions of skirmishes with Confederate Bushwackers. His account also provides readers with information regarding his capture, transfer, imprisonment and anticipated release. The diary concludes with his arrival in Washington, D.C. as workers were placing Thomas Crawford's statue atop the U.S. Capitol 2 December 1863. Supplementary pages include addresses of boarding houses and roadside inns, as well as notations regarding McCandliss's finances.
A small pocket within the binding contained a separate letter, dated 7 April 1865, authorizing the surgeon to administer to wounded soldiers until their impending transfer to Burke Station, Virginia. This was removed to a four-flap enclosure due to preservation concerns.
The Robert Robison McCandliss Diary is identified as University Archives accession number 2015-16.042. Preliminary processing of the diary was completed by Paul A. Thomsen on August 17, 2011.

McCandliss, Robert Robinson

Manhattan, Kansas carte de visite photographs

  • US US kmk P2000.01
  • Collection
  • 1863-1866

The collection consists of four Carte de visites (CdV) documenting Manhattan, Kansas and spanning the years 1863-1866. The photographs have been attributed to George Burgoyne (active Manhattan 1859-1890), and were presumably taken from his studio window. At the time of acquisition (2000), all four views bore pencilled identifications on the versos, each image identified as Burgoyne's work, each subject identified and dated. Some of this information was presumably transferred from an album that once included the pictures.
The earliest CdV, dated 1863, includes Manhattan's main street, Poyntz Avenue, looking towards the East. The second, dated 1864, presents the town's residences, outhouses and dirt streets in the direction of Bluemont Hill to the North. The third and fourth images return to the easterly vantage point of the 1863 image. One shows phalanxed U.S. troops crossing the mouth of the Big Blue River as part of the Indian Expedition 28 June 1865. The final Carte de visite, dated 1866, reveals the addition of new commercial buildings along the city's main artery.
The collection is an important one for frontier Manhattan, as it includes the earliest known views of its commercial and residential districts.

Burgoyne, George

Harvey Honnold souvenir album

  • Collection
  • 1861-1906

Album of family photographs associated with sign and house painter Harvey Honnold of Olathe, Kansas.  Photographs are the products of professional studios in Kansas, Missouri, Ohio and Tennessee.  Most are cabinet photographs, but some are tintypes, others in carte-de-visite format.  One photograph is marked “H. Honnold taken on Cedar Creek west of Olathe somewhere north of Farland, HoughlandNeighborhood/Taken by Bert Honnold” Circa 1892.

Honnold, Harvey

William Binnie journal

  • US US kmk 2019-20.002
  • Collection
  • 1907-1912

Personal journal kept by William Binnie, a Scottish-American self-taught naturalist, adventurer, explorer, businessman, developer and photographer between August 20, 1907 and April 11, 1912. Much of the journal’s content centers on ornithological references to eastern Kansas.

Binnie, William

Arthur H. Gilles World War I collection

  • US US kmk U2007.12
  • Collection
  • 1917-1918

After graduating from Kansas State Agricultural College in 1914, Gilles entered World War I in 1918. This collection spans the years 197 to 1919 and consists of five boxes.

Gilles, Arthur H.

George Wheatley Papers

  • Collection
  • 1909-1923

These papers include the wartime correspondence and related documents of George Dudley Wheatley, a first lieutenant in the United States Army who was involved in several decisive actions of the Allied Expeditionary Forces (AEF) during the First World War.  The collection consists of 122 pieces and spans the years 1909; 1916-1919; 1923.
The documents presented in this collection offer a historically important window into the daily life of soldiers involved in America’s first major involvement in international military affairs beginning with a document from a friend stationed in the Dominican Republic in 1916 to a then stateside George Wheatley.  It describes the occupation and sentiments towards Americans, combat encountered by Army and Marine Corps units, along with personal commentary on college football and the reelection of Woodrow Wilson.
The majority of the collection involves letters mailed from George Wheatley to his parents. They begin with his time at the officer’s candidate training school at Plattsburg, New York, in 1917.  Among the items mentioned is the effects and treatment of a camp epidemic of German measles.  They are followed by letters referring to the accommodations and experiences aboard his transport ship to Europe in 1918 (the SS Mongolia), and travels through England and France, including tourism, military railway transportation, and the conduct of the French military, and his activities at an Allied Expeditionary Forces school in Chatillon-sur-Seine.  The remainder of the letters is an account of his experiences on the battle front in 1918.
The strength of the collection is the letters written to his father in 1919 from Springfield, Vermont, after he returned to the United States and was discharged from the U. S. Army.  Wheatley provides vivid descriptions of his involvement in combat on the front lines, including letters that describe his being wounded on two occasions while in combat, his association with Colonel William “Wild Bill” Donovan, and military engagements from the beginning of 1918 until the end of the war. A few of his letters provide eye witness accounts of Donovan’s leadership, participation in combat, and being wounded. Donovan later became head of the Office of Strategic Services and played an important role in forming the Central Intelligence Agency.  Among the pages of a small notebook is a chronological list Wheatley maintained of his whereabouts from the time he entered the military in January 1918, through his movements in Europe, and until his discharge on April 1, 1919.
The following are among the locations noted by Wheatley in his papers during the war: Chatillon, Rambervillers, Moyermont, Chattel sur Moselle, Coulars, Ecury-sur-Coole, La Borry, Jonchery, Suippes Valley, Vardeney, Epieds, Montport, Barritz, Bordeaux,  Paris, Blois, St. Organy, La Marche, Chateau Thierry, St. Mihiel, Verdin, Mountfaucon, Landres et St. Georges, St. Georges, Exermont, Les Petes Armoises, Le Vivier, Artaise, Chaumont, Sedan, Buzaucy, Thenorgnes, Argonne. Muese-Argonne.

Wheatley, George

Gavitt Medical Company papers

  • Collection
  • 1895-1928

Gavitt Medical Co. Records were donated to the University Archives at Kansas State University by Professor Charles Gardner Shaw in 1971. This collection is identified as accession number PC 1988.07.
This collection consists of correspondence documenting sales of the Gavitt System Regulator. The majority of the letters are requests to purchase the product, some detailing how they first received the product and giving glowing testimonials of how it helped them: <emph render='italic'>"It has cured me of a bad case of Catarrh and heart disease, and is commencing to give me strength."</emph> Other letters are inquiries about becoming agents for the company, explaining that either the correspondent is unaware of anyone selling their product in the area, or that the current agent is unable to continue to provide adequate service for the area.
Probably the most significant correspondence in the collection are the reports which the agents sent to the company's office in Topeka documenting the sales of the product. Many of these reports were penned on the back of the correspondence from the company, providing valuable insight into the times. The company letters include arguments for convincing the reluctant buyer to purchase their product: <emph render='italic'>"Many say they employ a family physician after they get sick. The graveyards are full of people who had family physicians called after they got sick. The time to take medicine is when the disease first makes its appearance and the only way to take it is to have it in the house handy at all times."</emph> The company also provides advice on marketing, suggesting that agents target parents with sons in the military: <emph render='italic'>"...we have not heard of a single case where the soldiers have had Malaria, Typhoid or Yellow fever where they had a box of our System Regulator sent to them."</emph>
Interspersed throughout the collection are personal letters from the Shore family and friends. These letters document the events in the lives of the family and the communities of Alma, Clay Center, Emporia and White City, Kansas, including births, deaths, and assorted gossip.
Of particular note is a letter from Jesse L. Shore to Kansas Secretary of State, George Clark, pointing out a error in the Session Laws of 1901, Chapter 420, and requesting that Mr. Clark check the actual bill to make sure it is correct. Mr. Clark's reply confirms that the error is in the bill as well and that the bill is invalid until the legislature meets again and can correct it.

Gavitt Medical Company

Pearce-Keller American Legion Post 17

  • Collection
  • 1921-1929

The records of Pearce-Keller American Legion Post 17, Manhattan, Kansas, covers a nine-year period from 1921 to 1929 and documents a variety of daily actions at the post. A marjority of the records, however, fall between 1924 and 1928.
The correspondence series is made up of fifteen folders. A large portion of the records include correspondence between the Pearch-Keller post commanders and various elements of the American Legion, such as other post commanders in Kansas, the State Adjutant, and members of the Pearce-Keller Post. I
The financial records consists of nine folders. Researchers will find purchase receipts from businesses around Manhattan, checkbooks, deposit slips and bank statements.
The membership series is made up of nine folders and includes publications from the State Adjutant regarding the condition of American Legion membership across Kansas and membership lists from the Pearce-Keller over the nine years the collections covers.
The fourth series in this collection concerns Printed Material from the main office of the American Legion, Pearce-Keller post commanders to members regarding meetings and other American Legion functions. Also in this series researchers will find publications from the State and Pearce-Keller Post Adjutants as well as the United States government from the years 1922 to 1928.
The fifth series, Official American Legion Forms and other documents, is stored in one box. In this series researchers will find official American Legion membership records and card issuing booklets as well as ballots from the election of post officers covering 1921 to 1929.
While most of the documents in this collection fall between 1924 and 1928, there is a noticable gap in records that covers most of 1926 where little information is present.
The most notable figure in the collection, from a perspective of Kansas State University history, is former Post Commander Clearence O. Price. C. O. Price was Post Commander at Pearce-Keller and was an Assistant to the President of Kansas State University from 1920 to 1951.

Price, Clearance O.

Samuel Fremont Goheen papers

  • Collection
  • 1912-1933

This collection includes approximately 120 items, housed in one document box, relating to Samuel Fremont Goheen’s career as mayor of Manhattan, Kansas.
Series 1 consists of correspondence dating from 1915-1918, including letters to and from Goheen concerning Manhattan city government and greeting cards.
Series 2 consists of business documents, 1914-1917, including hand-written drafts of proclamations, heath and sanitation recommendations and tax levies are within this series.
Series 3, financial documents, consists of one ledger titled "Day Book" with entries dating 1912-1919.  It contains entries concerning the sale of groceries, coal and real estate property.
Series 4, literary productions, contains four pieces of handwritten poems, a manuscript entitled "A Quaker Wedding," and an ink drawing.
Series 5, the largest portion of the collection, is comprised of printed material with items dating from 1912-1933, including newspaper clippings about with World War I, prohibition, the jitney business, community sanitary precautions, and city ordinances, as well as pamphlets and single pages from pamphlets.
Note: The original state of the Samuel Fremont Goheen papers has made it difficult to accurately date and locate the source of many of the items.  Dates have been drawn from item content or subject matter.

Goheen, Samuel Fremont

Munger Family papers

  • Collection
  • 1870-1936

The Munger Family papers documents three generations of correspondence within the family, on topics regarding their businesses, health, weather, and current events.

Part one includes correspondence between George Munger Sr. and his daughters Martha and Belle while they attended St. Mary’s in Notre Dame, Indiana. George Sr. corresponded with his wife, Susan while she was in the hospital for rheumatism during 1903. Other letters to George are from his father, Lyman Munger and his brother, Pliny Munger.

Part two is comprised of Belle Munger Riggle’s correspondence, which makes up the bulk of the collection. Letters between Belle and her husband, Edward, discuss business at Catalpa Knob and other places he worked as well as the welfare of their children. After Edward died in 1910, Belle married Irvin Hays Rice.

These letters provide historical information about the locations they were written from, which include Kansas, Illinois, California, and Indiana. Topics covered include business and economic matters, social and cultural life, family relationships, and conditions of the United States during the span of this collection.

Munger, George Merrick

Harriet Parkerson Papers

  • Collection
  • 1874-2007

The Harriet Parkerson papers contain writings for the Domestic Science Club (some were not presented), financial records in the forms of receipts and cancelled checks and a copy of the published version of her sister's, Julie Etta Parkerson Reynolds 1874 journal.  The papers are housed in two boxes.
Literary Works makes up the bulk of the collection and contains papers Harriet wrote to present to the Domestic Science Club and one paper written by Ellen Goodnow.  For the most part, these presentations are random topics that the women appear to have picked themselves.  They bridge a wide array of subject matter and are all not focused on the matters of what people would tend to think of as Domestic Science.  While Harriet wrote about topics such as baking, soaps and soap making, and wardrobe maintenance, she also wrote about historical figures like Anne Louise Germaine Necker, Leo Tolstoy, and Michael Faraday.  One of the more interesting items from this series is the story of Soonboonagen Ammal, a female martyr from India.
The Financial Series contain receipts and cancelled checks.  The receipts are organized chronologically and are mostly from the years between 1909 and 1912.  Many of the receipts are for magazine subscriptions and rental of a post office box.  Other receipts are for necessities and items such as landscaping, flowers, and oats.  The cancelled checks are from three different banks and sorted alphabetically by bank.  The checks are from the financial institutions First National Bank, Mahattan State Bank, and Union National Bank.  The checks are mostly made out to individuals including her nephew Louis and herself (checks labeled "myself"); a few are aslo written out to institutions or businessess like Kansas State Agricultural College, Montgomery Wards, and Kimball Printing Co.
Printed Material is made up of Harriet's sister's, Julie Etta Parkerson Reynolds 1874 Journal, an agricultural magazine, the 1936-1937 Domestic Science Club booklet, and a few newspaper clippings.
The Department of Special Collections has Harriet Parkerson's journal on microfilm and the original is located at the Kansas State Historical Society in Topeka, Kansas.  Additional information about Harriet can be found in the History Index located in Special Collections.

Parkerson, Harriet

Lucille Byarlay Abel papers

  • Collection
  • 1928-1937

The Lucille Byarlay Abel papers include diaries of Lucille's time as a student at Kansas State Agricultural College and Kansas State College from 1928 to 1937.  She created the entries in the day books and collected comments and signatures in the autograph books from classmates, friends, and acquaintances.  Additional materials include transcriptions of the diaries, Kansas maps, genealogy charts, photographs, newspaper clippings, legal documents, and a name index.  Subjects include her courtship with Orval Abel, her teaching duties in Clay County, Kansas, rural social activities in the 1930s, and genealogy.

Abel, Lucille Byarlay

Edna Worthley Underwood papers

  • Collection
  • 1889-1946

The Edna Worthley Underwood Papers (1889-1946) covers the period of her most active publishing. Underwood wrote original works of plays, poetry, prose, short stories and news articles. She also translated various author's works into English. She corresponded with many of the authors, often asking for a biographical sketch and a photograph. After 1938, not much is known of her life. She did not publish but traveled in the U.S.   The papers are contained in five document boxes (2.1 linear feet) and span the years 1889-1946.
They are divided into six series: 1)Correspondence, 1910-1944; 2) Literary Works, 1927-1938; 3) Individuals, 1918-1939; 4) Scrapbooks, 1905-1940, 5) Notebooks, 1889-1924; and 6) Printed Material, 1895-1946. Photographs have been transferred to the photograph collection of the University Archives.  Literary Works (1927-1938) is divided into several sub series.
Original Works contains works by Underwood; criticism of other authors; news articles on points of interest; notes; poems; prose; play, A Petersburg Night; short stories, "The Shudder of Don Giovanni", "Madame Dorette and Nature", and three untitled. The sub-series: 1) Translations, includes translations of short stories put into the book Flemish Short Stories; 2) plays, The Yellow Tent and Improvisations in June poems; 3) short stories, "The Van Helmers", "The Beggar Minar", "Tramp and Peasant", "Vaudrevil", "If Life is White", "Exile", "A Game of Chess", "Martha Timar", "Father, A Portrait", "The Trick", "Christmas Eve", and "The Wedding". Also included are original works by Aberto Zum Felde, Fernand Knopf, Robert Earl Underwood, and works by unknown authors. The last sub series contains miscellaneous items.
The series Individuals (1918-1939) contains folders on individuals that Underwood corresponded with and whose works she translated. The folders contain correspondence and original works of poetry and prose. The individuals include Max Dickman, Fabio Fiallo, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Luis Felipe Rodriguez, Daniel Thaly, and Cesar Vallejo.
The series Scrapbooks (1905-1940) contains three scrapbooks. Scrapbook #1 covers 1905-1939. It contains newspaper clippings, letters and various printed material. Scrapbook #2 covers literature of South America. It contains correspondence and original works of poetry. Individuals included are Julio Herrera, Xavier Abril, Carlos Wyld Ospina, Lartigau Lespada, Juan Borch, and Fernando Torregrosa. Scrapbook #3 contains correspondence and poetry from individual poets included in Underwood's translation of poets from Haiti. The poets include Emile Roumer, Clement Magloire, Maurice Casseus, Carl Brouard, Milo Riguad, Jacques Romain, Justinien Ricot, Jean F. Brierre, and Timothee Paret.
The series Notebooks (1889-1924) contains seven notebooks. They cover the time Underwood attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. These are handwritten notes from lectures. Notebook #5 contains prose written in 1924, thirty years after her graduation from the University. The last series, Printed Material, contains booklets, "El Pais Lilac", "Revista de Las Indias", "The Hobart Guild", "De Godsdienstige Keinst Van Rubens", "La Poesia Sorprendida", and "Requiem Por Los Muertos De Europa"; translations: newspaper clippings: and miscellaneous.
Twelve photographs were removed and filed in the University Archives photograph collection under the heading of Underwood. The photographs include Maurice Andre Casseus, Concepcion Monterrosa, Cesar Vallejo (2), Xavier Abril de Viver, Jorge Luis Borges, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Helery, Balleitein de Martin, and unknown.

Underwood, Edna Worthley

Ada Rice papers

  • Collection
  • 1896-1948

The Ada Rice papers include photocopied typescript and manuscript short stories of fiction and nonfiction, as well as digitized images from her life, between 1896 and 1948.  They are from the early twentieth century and cover subjects like children's literature, Filipino life and culture, genealogy, George Washington's first cabinet, gold mining, John Quincy Adams, King's College (now Columbia University), London (England) life and culture, and orphan trains.  The photographs include her portraits, her Manhattan home, the 1896 Mt. Pleasant (Kansas) school and students she taught, her international travels, and an American College Quill Club program.

Rice, Ada

Nels A. Tornquist papers

  • Collection
  • 1888-1950

This manuscript collection, consisting of approximately 450 items housed in one box. The material spans the years 1888-1950. Series 1, Military Papers (1898-1950), is the largest series and it is divided into the following sub-series: Spanish-American War, 1898; Cavalry Units, 1906-1915; Punitive Expedition Diary, ca. 1916; Letters of Recommendation, 1914-1919; Stateside Mobilization Camps, 1917-1918; Embarkation to France, 1918; Company Command in France, 1918-1919; 344th Labor Battalion Company Funds and Payroll; General A.E.F. Orders and Memoranda, 1919; Demobilization in France, 1919; Demobilization Camp in U.S., 1919; and, Retirement, ROTC and IRS, 1919-1950. Enroute to Namiquipa - U.S. Soldiers bathing, ca 1916 A Spanish-American War Roster and a roster of the 344th Labor Battalion (WWI) are interesting for their notations of names and addresses of the men who participated in these wars. The papers reveal the rapid promotion Nels A. Tornquist received after he was selected to command a black service company The certificates show that he was promoted from sergeant to first lieutenant in July of 1918 and then to captain the following month, just in time to take his new command to France during WWI. Among the activities documented in the papers during the time Capt. Tornquist commanded the black service company is a serious incident concerning large quantities of unexpended ammunition that the men in his company were expected to work around at their own risk. There are two folders in the collection that deal with the 344th Labor Battalion. One rare find in the collection is a war diary of the Punitive Expedition into Mexico after Pancho Villa, ca. 1916-1917. The comments on forage problems, climate and travel are noteworthy. Series 2, Personal Correspondence, is divided between that of Nels A. and Nels F. Tornquist. The father, Nels F., received all of his letters from his native Sweden so they are written in that language. The son's letters, fortunately for the Army censors during WWI, are written in English and are addressed to his step-mother Carrie. There are also many envelopes without the enclosures but they are useful for showing Tornquist's change of address as he moved from one unit to another throughout his career. Tornquist astride an Indian, U.S. Mobilization Camp, 1918 Series 3, Legal Papers, contains an original Kansas homestead deed for Salina, Kansas in 1888 and deeds for property in Washington state. Series 4, Certificates, indicate the official notification of each rank that Nels A. Tornquist achieved. A so included are notifications of retirement after 24 years of honorable service with the pre-WWI rank of sergeant; the notification in 1934 that he advanced to the retired rank of captain; and an undated memorial on behalf of the United States, signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Series 5, Printed Material, includes many souvenirs, train passes and army pamphlets from WWI. Of particular interest are War Information series pamphlets entitled, The War Message and the Facts Behind It, printed in June, 1917 and Treaty of Peace with Germany, printed in June, 1919. The remainder of the printed material is a mixture of wedding announcements, veterans organization membership cards, and incidental items. Series 6, is comprised of maps showing the progress of WWI and WWII. There is an excellent period map of Verdun, France which Capt. Tornquist personally annotated to show where he spent time prior to and after the armistice of November 11, 1918. 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 Approximately 61 photographs from the Spanish-American War, the Mexican border during 1916-1917 and WWI were filed in the KSU photograph collection, and several three-dimensional items were stored with the artifacts collection. A number of WWI and WWII maps were transferred to the Documents Department in the library. Of related interest is an oral history interview between Carl Rehfeld, the uncle of Nels Tornquist, and Evan Williams of Farrell Library. The tape and transcript are in the University Archives Oral History Collection.

Tornquist, Nels A.

George Washington Owens papers

  • Collection
  • 1875-1950

The Owens Papers (1890-1946) contain ten items consisting of a scrapbook, two diplomas, two certificates, and five photographs. They were donated to the University Archives by his daughter, Ana Elnora Owens. The scrapbook contains a handwritten autobiography (20 pages) and a "History of Agricultural Instruction in Virginia" (14 pages), both written in 1945-1946. Owens' autobiography describes his childhood in Kansas (near Alma in Wabaunsee County) and his experience at Kansas State Agricultural College as the first Black person to graduate from the institution in 1899. It provides a description of his employment at Tuskegee Institute after graduation where he worked under Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver. He left Tuskegee in 1908 to take a position at the Virginia Normal and Industrial School (Virginia State College) in Petersburg where he had a very successful career.
His writings describe the agricultural program at the school and his work in Virginia as the leader in vocational agriculture, including his organizational efforts for the New Farmers of Virginia that became the New Farmers of America. He provides an extensive list of others who were involved in vocational agriculture throughout the state. The two diplomas were awarded at the time of his graduation from high school in Wabaunsee County, Kansas in 1890, and Kansas State Agricultural College in 1899 where he obtained a bachelor of science degree in the "general course." The two certificates in the collection were awarded by Virginia State College. The first is a "Certificate of Merit" for ten years of service in 1945 and the second in appreciation for his teaching and service presented by the Alumni Association in 1946. Two of the five photographs show Owens as a student at KSAC in 1899 (one in his cadet uniform), two with his wife, Waddie Hill (a wedding photo in 1901 and another in 1903 with their newborn child), and one taken at the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute in 1920.

Owens, George Washington

Henry F. Kupfer papers

  • Collection
  • 1940-1953

This collection contains items related to the military service of Henry F. Kupfer, a Kansas State University alumnus of the class of 1940, including military service records (personnel records, medical examinations, certifications, memoranda, discharge documents, etc.) dating from 1940 to 1953, the February 28, 1944 issue of the 6th Air Force magazine <emph render='italic'>Carribean Breeze</emph>, a leatherbound scrapbook/photo album dating from 1942 to 1944 (the binding is likely from South or Central America), and Kupfer's service diary, containing entries from 1936 to 1944 including recollections of travel, duty assignments, promotions, medical examinations, and social activities.  (Note: the blank diary itself has a copyright date of 1941; entries from 1936-1940 were entered later, and briefly delineate Kupfer's time in the Kansas State University Reserve Officer Training Corps).  Also included is a compact disc labelled "Henry Kupfer - Veterans History Project," which was not readable at the time this entry was written.

Kupfer, Henry F.

Nellie Kedzie Jones series

  • Collection
  • 1860–1955

The Nellie Kedzie Jones series is part of the College of Human Ecology historical files at Kansas State University. Nellie Sawyer Kedzie Jones was an 1876 alumna who returned to lead domestic science instruction from 1882 until 1897. This series reflects papers related to her and her relatives and friends.
The first subseries pertains to Nellie Sawyer Kedzie Jones with dates between 1889 and 1955. Contents include developments in human ecology and are reflected in publications, printed materials, published works, manuscripts, typescripts, awards, and correspondence. Materials are organized chronologically within each group.
The second subseries is devoted to Howard Murray Jones, Nellie's husband from 1901 until his death in 1953. He was a minister, including time as a professor and administrator at Berea College. Contents include minimal correspondence along with writings, sermons, and printed materials. His sermons are arranged chronologically divided between typed and handwritten. Because he often used sermons twice, there are two dates on the manuscripts. The bulk of the materials pertains to religion and Christianity.
The third through ninth subseries contain information about friends and relatives of Howard and Nellie. Included are documents associated with the Fairchild family (Frank, David, and George Fairchild), Abby and Charles Marlatt, Gertrude and Theodore Jessup, Robert Clark Kedzie (Nellie's first husband who died in 1882), Addison Jones, his father, Ada Alice Tuttle, and Helen M. Jones. Types of material include news articles, correspondence, memoranda, printed materials, scrapbooks, and biographical information.
The tenth subseries includes five items relevant to Nellie: an autograph book, a scrapbook, a personal Bible, an award ribbon, and a leather pouch or wallet (unknown origin or ownership).
The final subseries includes photographs of Nellie and those associated with her. They are divided by group photos, photos of her, and photos of others who include Robert Clark Kedzie, Howard Murray Jones, the Fairchilds, and others.

College of Human Ecology

Pillsbury Family papers

  • Collection
  • 1948-1958

The Pillsbury Family Papers (1848-1958), contain a diary, a survey book, correspondence, literary works, research, and printed material. The papers, consisting of approximately 150 items, are housed in two document boxes. The papers are divided into six series l) diary, 1858-1860, 2) survey book, (1860); 3) correspondence, 1848-1958, 4) literary works, 1932-1940; 5) research; and 6) printed material. The major portion of the collection consists of material from Annie Pillsbury Young, daughter of Josiah H. and Alnora (Pervier) Pillsbury. The first and second series containing a diary (1858-1860) and a survey book (1860) of Josiah H. Pillsbury have significant historical information about his life in the Zeandale Township area, as well as his civil engineering pursuits. The copy of the diary has been translated by Mrs. E.M. Platt of Manhattan, Kansas, as it was in Isaac Pittman shorthand of 1850-60 period. The location of the original diary is unknown. The second folder contains page markers containing notes taken from the copy of the diary. Page numbers have been recorded on the markers for future reference. The diary of Josiah H. Pillsbury documents family history of the Pillsbury clan from 1858 to 1860 in the Zeandale Township area. Recorded are trials of illness and disease, weather hazards, and political turmoil of the period. Through the diary, however, Josiah H. Pillsbury remains a devoted family man, dedicated to preserving a community for which a family could be proud to reside. The work ethic was ingrained in him, as exemplified by being a carpenter, farmer, surveyor, newspaperman, political delegate, teacher, assistant clergyman, and postmaster, during his lifetime. Josiah H. Pillsbury was meticulous with numbers. The survey book (1860) has records of transactions for school, house, and fence building. A major portion is devoted to surveying for road construction into the Manhattan, Kansas area. The correspondence of the Pillsbury Family Papers is the third series in the collection. It is basically composed of letters of Annie Pillsbury Young, daughter of Josiah H. and Alnora (Pervier) Pillsbury. The time period ranges from 1848 through 1958. Mrs. Young was a prolific writer with numerous personal as well as business letters in the seven folders. Many of the letters involved correspondence with her sister Nellie on family concerns. Much of the business correspondence pertained to family genealogy. Folder four contains early letters dated 1871, Folder five contains typescript from 1848 to 1872, The location of the originals is unknown. Both sections give insight into the strong commitment to religion and family life of the Pillsbury family. Also, a firm belief that migrating to the Kansas area was the way of the future. Literary Works comprise the fourth series in the collection. Annie Pillsbury Young devoted time to writing essays and poetry. Some of the material appears to be partially autobiographical, such as "When Mother Was A Girl". She presented many of these writings to the newspaper for printing and to the literary societies' reading circles. The series, ranging in years 1932 to 1940, is contained in thirteen folders. The fifth series is devoted to research on the Pillsbury Family Biographical notes, as well as the personal accounts of Annie Pillsbury Young are incorporated in this section of material. The "Civic Center," in particular, should be of interest to researchers wanting insight into her father's dreams of success for Zeandale Township. Five folders house the research series of the collection. Printed Material is the sixth series in the Pillsbury Family Papers. This folder contains newspaper clippings, songs, and a brief excerpt about Josiah H. Pillsbury, by his son, Arthur J. Pillsbury. Four photographs have been removed from the papers and filed in the University Archives photograph collection. A list of the photographs is located after the container list.

Pillsbury Family

Alice C. Nichols papers

  • Collection
  • 1914-1961

The Alice C. Nichols papers (1922-1962) contain correspondence, notebooks, tax records, book typescripts, drafts of articles, newspaper clippings and printed material. These items document the time in which Ms. Nichols established herself as a writer from the age of nine until her death in 1969, with special emphasis on the year 1954 when her most notable publication, Bleeding Kansas, was published.
The papers are housed in five boxes constituting two linear feet. The papers are divided into five series: 1) correspondence, 2) notebooks and notes, 3) financial records, 4) literary productions and 5) printed material. Each series is arranged chronologically.
The correspondence series includes the years 1942-1961. it contains both personal and business letters. The personal correspondence is generally congratulatory during the time Ms. Nichols wrote and published Bleeding Kansas.The business correspondence deals with magazine editors of Country Gentlemen, Men's Wear, American Home, Collier's, Ladies' Home Journal and Farm Journal with whom Ms. Nichols collaborated when she worked for the United States Department of Agriculture as food guide editor. The majority of the business correspondence is with Oxford university Press, publishers of Bleeding Kansas. Some notable correspondents include Milton Eisenhower when he was President of Pennsylvania State college and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Correspondents from Kansas include Robert Conover of the English Department of Kansas State College and the staff of the Kansas State Historical Society.
The next series, notebooks and notes, include notes for two literary works ("A Group of Joe Nelson" and "The Self Possessed"), geology notes, class notes, and notes taken from a meeting in Liberal, Kansas. Financial records, series three, are from 1947 to 1956. The contain U.S. and New York State income tax returns, profit shares from Western Printing and Lithographing, inc., a royalty account at Oxford university Press and the results of a trip to the Saratoga Racetrack.
The literary productions series is divided into five sub-series: 1) books, 2) photostats, 3) articles, 4) article summaries and 5) drafts. Two complete typescripts and one carbon copy are included in the books sub-series. The two books, both written by Ms. Nichols, are entitled D.A. Fay and One Destiny. Within the photostats are maps, newspapers and illustrations proposed to be included in Bleeding Kansas. The 27 articles are primarily children's short stories. They were written when Ms. Nichols was employed by Artist and Writers Guild, Inc.
The summaries of articles by Ms. Nichols include seven articles written about such topics as the Reformation, free will, letter writing, medieval church, and modern science. They were apparently completed just before Ms. Nichols' death in 1969. The drafts are hand and typewritten stories, predominately unfinished, with one finished work: "Heracitus on Essays in Optimism".
The series of printed material has five sub-series. The are 1) magazines and articles, 2) newspapers (Nichols Journal), 3) newspapers (originals), 4) newspapers (photocopies) and 5) miscellaneous. Magazines and articles are printed articles from the Century Magazine, each on a different topic, which Ms. Nichols used in her ten-year research process for Bleeding Kansas. The second sub-series contains one issue of The Nichols Journal, Ms. Nichols first publications. She published the small newspaper in Liberal, Kansas when she was nine years old.
The third and fourth sub-series (newspapers, originals and photocopies) cover the years 1947-1961. The highlight the publication Bleeding Kansas and include reviews, autograph sessions with Ms. Nichols and summaries of her book. Also included in the newspapers sub-series are articles about the history of Liberal and Ms. Nichols' parents. Cities represented among the newspapers are Chicago, San Francisco, Detroit and Atlanta.
The miscellaneous sub-series of publications houses such items as a bookjacket of Bleeding Kansas, a program from the Mid-America Regional Writers Conference held at Kansas State College and a briefing from the United States Court of Appeals, U.S. against James W. Elwell and Co., Inc. and Charleston Stevedoring Company, et.al.

Nichols, Alice C

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