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Marlin Fitzwater papers

  • US US kmk P2014.04
  • Collection
  • 1942-

The collection documents the personal and professional activities of Marlin Fitzwater. He served as Assistant to the President for Press Relations under Reagan, and Press Secretary under George H.W. Bush. The bulk of the records in this collection were produced and/or collected by Fitzwater during his years in the White House and in the following years as a lecturer and author. Items include memos, speeches, interviews, correspondence schedules, reports, and other documents. Items of note include correspondence to and from Presidents Reagan and Bush, newswires, briefings, records documenting U.S. and Soviet relations, economic summits, and other foreign and domestic policy decisions made during the terms of Reagan and Bush, Gulf War of 1990-1991. Other items of note in the collection include World War II ration cards belonging of Marlin Fitzwater parents, speeches delivered by Marlin Fitzwater after he left the White House, manuscripts and research materials related to his books, photo albums and numerous photographs of the White House period, posters, and numerous memorabilia items.

Fitzwater, Marlin

Shirley Smith papers

  • US US kmk P2014.1o
  • Collection
  • 1937-2011

The Shirley Smith Papers (1937-2011) include a wide array of varying fields and topics following the life and career of Shirley Smith. Growing up in rural Kansas and graduating from Kansas State College in 1951, Smith moved to New York City to begin her career as a model, then Broadway actress. In the early 1960s, Smith began to lose her hearing and focused her talents instead on an art career, which she continued for over 50 years. Much of her artwork hearkens back to Kansas roots, while other pieces are considered within the lyrical abstraction art movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Smith, Shirley

Joel Climenhaga papers

  • US US kmk U2001.02
  • Collection
  • 1912-2001

The Joel Climenhaga Papers (1912-2001) consist primarily of his literary works and correspondence to and from family and friends.
The Biographical Series consist of two boxes which include Climenhaga's baby book, family genealogy, obituary, and memorial service program, and 1987 Kansas State University retirement tributes.
The Correspondence Series is made up of fourteen boxes and arranged alphabetically. Climenhaga was a prolific and voluminous writer. He corresponded with Mina Cooper, Carlos Cortez, Charles Jones, George Moberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and Kenneth Patchen to name a few. Within the Charles Jones correspondence there are letters by LBJ (Lyndon B. Johnson) and from people who opposed him agreeing with the NCAAP- these letters were signed by "a white Christian" or "a white, white, American." There are twenty-four folders of correspondence between Climenhaga and Fred Shaw. The two men planned to turn their correspondence into a book titled The Mephisto Addenda. Before this could manifest, Fred Shaw passed away. The Climenhaga's were good friends with Kenneth and Miriam Patchen and there is extensive correspondence between the two families. The sub-series "Correspondence to Poetry Magazines" is listed alphabetically by magazine title and consists of one box.
The sub-series "Correspondence Log" is arranged chronologically and is stored in eighteen boxes. It is similar to a journal as Climenhaga made personal entries on specific dates and if those dates corresponded with writing or receiving a letter, the letter was included. Names of those who Climenhaga corresponded includes Marlon Brando, Milton Bernard, John and Emma Climenhaga, Mina Cooper, Norman Fedder, Henry Miller, Kenneth Patchen, George Savage, Fred Shaw, Wesley Van Tassel, Myrna Wolfe, and Kenneth Woodroofe. These letters were pulled from the alphabetical listing by Climenhaga. It is not known why Climenhaga separated these letters.
Literary Works is comprised of twenty-two boxes that contain Climenhaga's plays and poems, as well as fiction stories and essays. During his lifetime Climenhaga had at least seven columns in various newspapers and newsletters. Three of his columns One Man's Frontier, One Man's Journey, and Dear Good People often had the same material while the introduction was sometimes different or a sentence or two rearranged. One Man's Journey was also broadcasted on the KKSC Radio station at Kansas State University during the 1980s. Climenhaga was a notorious recycler of paper. He often used recycled paper which can be confusing to researchers. If researchers pay close attention, however, they just might find that "recycled" paper useful after all, as it could be a part of another story, poem, etc., whether written by Climenhaga or one of his many friends or colleagues. Climenhaga wrote his first poem at age six. By 1989, he had written approximately 2,500 poems of which 1,200 had been published in various magazines and journals. Volumes of his published poems include: The Age of Pollution; Belief in Chaos; Hawk and Chameleon; The Month of the Shadow on My Heart; Ninety-Nine Messages from Separate Places; None of this Really Matters a Great Deal Now; One Hundred and One Songs are Promised for Tomorrow; Preliminary Walk into the Sweat of Dying; Report on the Progress of the Bearded One's Homework; Spontaneity is a Deceiving God; and The Thirteenth Winter.
Subject Series is contained in seventeen boxes and is organized alphabetically. It includes names such as Charles Jackson Jones, Jr. who was married to artist Molly Ramolla, Kenneth Patchen, and Larry Smith. It also includes programs from plays produced, written, and directed by Climenhaga. Other programs include plays produced at the Purple Masque Theatre, Kansas State University; by the Pine Cone Players, Grand Lake, CO; and at UCLA.
The Photograph and Slides Series consists of one box and includes photos of the 1976 Pine Cone Players, Grand Lake, Colorado, production of Mark Twain. Photos taken at the Purple Masque Theatre, Kansas State University include the 1981 production of Kenneth Patchen's Don't Look Now, the 1989 production of Dust-Storm Wedding, and Climenhaga's own play the Marriage Wheel. The Slides consist of Kenneth Patchen's art poetry.
Comprised of seven boxes, the Media Series includes cassette tapes, reel to reel tapes, VHS videotapes, and computer disks. The computer disks contain some of Climenhaga's manuscripts that were incorporated in the Literary Works Series. The cassette tapes include interviews with Ben Nyberg and Jonathan Holden, 1985 letters from Charles Jones, and Climenhaga's 1980s One Man's Journey recorded at KKSU radio, Kansas State University. The reel to reel tapes includes several different readings from Patchen's Don't Look Now. The VHS tapes include the "50th Anniversary of the 1939 Pottstown High School Graduates" of interviews with Earl "Yogi" Storm, Dr. Joel Esner, and Raymond Elliott conducted by Bill Achatz. Climenhaga was unable to attend this anniversary gathering where he and others were inducted into the Alumni Honor Roll. Climenhaga created a video to be played at the anniversary program and it is included in this series. The tape Miriam Is Not Amused, a film by Kim Roberts, 1996, is a profile of the life of Miriam Patchen with interesting information about her husband Kenneth Patchen. The most interesting tapes in this series, however, are the interviews with Joel Climenhaga. The one that stands out the most is the one created by the Manhattan, Kansas Art Councils, 1992, where John Biggs interviews Climenhaga.
There are some very interesting interviews with Joel Climenhaga, especially the one filmed by the Manhattan, Kansas Arts Council titled Joel: Creative Profile. Another VHS tape of interest is Miriam Is Not Amused, a film by Kim Roberts, 1996. This is a profile of the life of Miriam Patchen with interesting information about her husband, Kenneth Patchen.
Scrapbooks are contained in one box. The most notable is the Marriage Wheel by Joel Climenhaga with his notes written on the sides of each page. Another item of interest is the 1983-1988 Travel Journal. Climenhaga kept notes of his summer travels, how many miles he traveled, where he traveled to, and when and where he stopped to eat.
The Oversize Series is made up of one box that includes art, art poetry, poetry, and program posters. Notable sketches in this series are the drawing of Joel Climenhaga by Lawrence Ferlinghetti and the greeting to the Climenhagas from Carlos and Marianna Cortez in 1972. Kenneth Patchen's art poetry shows up in Lee Artz's "Passion for Peace," Peace Works, Mid-Peninsula Peace Center, Palo Alto, California and in Steven Ratiner's "The Picture Poems of Kenneth Patchen," California Living, 1983. There are four Kenneth Patchen poems included: "The Way Men Live Is a Life," 1944, "A Poem For Christmas," 1961, "What I'd Like To Know Is, 1967" and "A Mercy Filled and Defiant Xmas To All Still Worthy To Be Called Man," 1970. Program posters from the Kansas State University Purple Masque Theatre that are interesting include Mark Edward's Larger Than Life, 1978, Cindy Helfertstay's From Heaven to Hell, 1978, and Chloris Killian's 1981, The Dust-Storm Wedding. Other items of interest include Climenhaga's 1987 retirement certificate from Kansas State University and a letter from the then Provost, Owen J. Koeppe.
Stored in twenty boxes, the Printed Material includes Climenhaga's poetry magazines, published by him under his publishing company, Transient Press, and other research journals and books.

Climenhaga, Joel

Gavitt Medical Company papers

  • US US kmk P1988.07
  • Collection
  • 1895-1928

Gavitt Medical Co. Records were donated to the University Archives at Kansas State University by Professor Charles Gardner Shaw in 1971. This collection is identified as accession number PC 1988.07.
This collection consists of correspondence documenting sales of the Gavitt System Regulator. The majority of the correspondence pertains to purchasing the product, some detailing how they first received the product and giving glowing testimonials of how it helped them: "It has cured me of a bad case of Catarrh and heart disease, and is commencing to give me strength." Other letters are inquiries about becoming agents for the company, explaining that either the correspondent is unaware of anyone selling their product in the area, or that the current agent is unable to continue to provide adequate service for the area.
Probably the most significant correspondence in the collection is the reports which the agents sent to the company's office in Topeka documenting the sales of the product. Many of these reports were penned on the back of the correspondence from the company, providing valuable insight into the times. The company letters include arguments for convincing the reluctant buyer to purchase their product: "Many say they employ a family physician after they get sick. The graveyards are full of people who had family physicians called after they got sick. The time to take medicine is when the disease first makes its appearance and the only way to take it is to have it in the house handy at all times." The company also provides advice on marketing, suggesting that agents target parents with sons in the military: "...we have not heard of a single case where the soldiers have had Malaria, Typhoid or Yellow fever where they had a box of our System Regulator sent to them."
Interspersed throughout the collection are personal letters from the Shore family and friends. These letters document the events in the lives of the family and the communities of Alma, Clay Center, Emporia and White City, Kansas, including births, deaths, and assorted gossip.
Of particular note is a letter from Jesse L. Shore to Kansas Secretary of State, George Clark, pointing out a error in the Session Laws of 1901, Chapter 420, and requesting that Mr. Clark check the actual bill to make sure it is correct. Mr. Clark's reply confirms that the error is in the bill as well and that the bill is invalid until the legislature meets again and can correct it.

Gavitt Medical Company

Thomas Brooks papers

  • US US kmk P1988.44
  • Collection
  • 1911-1979

The Thomas Brooks Collection/Colston E. Warne Biography reflects the efforts of Brooks to write a biography on consumer leader, Colston Warne. A professor of Family Economics at Amherst College for 40 years, Warne played an important part in organizing professionals in the consumer affairs field. He was known for his many roles in the consumer movement, including: president of Consumers Union, development of the international consumer movement, serving on numerous governmental committees and advisory boards, and helping to introduce the consumers point of view into economic and political public policy decisions.
The Administrative Files are related to Brooks' management of the biography project, and they are arranged in four subseries. The first subseries from this file contains correspondence between Brooks and other individuals. This includes letters between Brooks and people such as; Warne, individuals who knew Warne, and publishers. The second subseries is financial documents and includes budget statements and store requisitions for the project. The third subseries is miscellaneous files of articles and papers written by Warne. The fourth subseries is the Warne biography research proposal written by Brooks and submitted to the College of Human Resources, Southern Illinois University.
The Research Files series, organized into seven subseries, contains research material on Warne collected by Brooks. The first subseries is Amherst College, 1931-1960. Because Warne spent most of his career at Amherst, this subseries, contains pertinent information about Warne and his profession. The second subseries is articles on Colston E. Warne. These are specific articles written by others about Warne and they include: "Colston Estey Warne: Mr. Consumer", "Dr. Warne is Honored by Unitarian Society", "Advertising: Study Stirs Debate on Values", "Consumer Groups Going International". The third subseries contains biographical notes taken by Brooks while researching Warne. The fourth subseries is organizations. They include: The American Association of University Women, The American Council on Consumer Interests, and Consumers' Union. The fifth subseries contains information about people. Included are: Ralph Nader, Celia Warne, and Colston Warne. The sixth subseries is subjects and includes files on advertising, consumers in the market, cooperatives, labor, the loyalty check, and speeches/statements. The final subseries is the Warne family tree.
In the third series are Warne's personal files consisting of four subseries. The first subseries is activities and associations. They include: Consumer Advisory Committee, Council of Economic Advisors to the President of the U.S., 1947-1951; Consumers Research, Advisory Board, 1929-1935; Consumers' Union, President and member, Board of Directors, 1936-1979; People's Lobby (Washington D.C.), President, 1934-1936, Honorary Vice President, 1941, Board of Directors, 1936-1950. The second subseries is Warne's diary. This is Warne's personal diary for the years 1911-1918. The third subseries is personal papers of Warne's. Included are his address books, a pamphlet written by him, and correspondence. The fourth subseries is organizations and includes: consumer cooperatives, the consumer movement, Consumers Research, People's Lobby, and other miscellaneous organizations. Two dissertations comprise, Literary Works. The first one is titled, "An Historical Analysis of the Growth of the National Consumer Movement in the United States from 1947 to 1967", by Jeanine Gilmartin. The second is titled, "The Consumer Movement in the Sixties", by David R. Case.
The fourth series contains oral interviews Brooks conducted with Warne, and other persons related to his life. There are typed transcripts for the majority of the interviews recorded on cassette audio tapes. The tapes have been separated from the collection and stored in the Consumer Movement Archives Oral History Collection. Among the thirty-two people interviewed were: Senator Paul Douglas, Leland Gordon, Florence Mason, Margaret Warne Nelson, Barbara Warne Newell, Esther Peterson, Celia Warne Tower, Clint Warne, Colston Warne, and Francis Warne.
The fifthth series contains printed material relating to the consumer movement. The majority of the printed material is either written by Warne or written about Warne. Approximately one hundred photographs were removed from the papers and filed in the University Archives Photograph Collection. The photographs are organized in three groups: Ithaca High School year book of 1916; Warne's career involving consumer movement events; and photographs of Warne at Amherst College. Included among the second group are photographs of the Consumer Advisory Council of 1948 and of 1962, Warne's visit to Japan with the Consumer's Association in 1961, Warne's visit to India in 1969, President Kennedy, Frances Warne, Walter Wilcox, and Richard Morse.

Brooks, Thomas Marion

Robertson Corporation records

  • US US kmk P2007.08
  • Collection
  • 1874-2009

The Correspondence Series is comprised of two boxes that extend over an 81-year period, starting in 1913 and ending in 2004 and arranged in alphabetical order. Majority of correspondence relate to the purchase of milling equipment such as elevators, dryers, flour packers, and sifters; the purchase of the Lemon Mill in Bedford, Indiana and the Ginger Feed and Elevator Company, Jeffersonville, Indiana; the sale of the company’s products such as corn meal, dog food, flour, livestock feed, and Glu-X; and the sale of the Seymour Mill. Correspondence between Phil Robertson and G. Terry Sharer, discusses historical milling machinery the Robertson Corporation donated to the Smithsonian in 1979. In 1980, Phil Robertson attended a reception hosted by the Smithsonian on the acceptance of the historical machinery. Equipment donated to the Smithsonian Institute.
The Financial Records are house in six boxes. Five boxes, 1928-2004, are filed in alphabetical order. They include annual meetings with statements of profit and loss, account ledgers, accountant's compilation report, auditors compilation report, balance sheets, cash flow statements, capital investments, estate transfers, financial statements, income tax basis, income tax returns, purchase orders from companies such as Advance Fabricators, Bearings Incorporation, Creason Corrugating, and Insects Limited, and sales and production figures. One box consists of the 1959 Ewing Mill appraisal, a Peoples bankbook, cash books, check stubs, financial ledgers, a payroll ledger from 1916 to 1917, production ledgers, sales slips, and a 1916 shipment register.
Minutes are stored in four boxes. (1960-1997, 2007-2009) are stored in two boxes and give insight on the daily, weekly, monthly and yearly goals of the Robertson Corporation. Each set of minutes contain travel plans, the price of crops on the market and a general overview of the company. There are two boxes of formal minutes in minute books (1960-2009).
The Subject Series (1874, 1881-2004) is the largest of all of the series. It is housed in nine boxes and contains insurance policies, newspaper clippings and class notes from when Joe E. Robertson attended Kansas State University in the 1940s. Listed alphabetically, the series covers the purchase and sale of mill property and equipment, contracts, events, feed and grain, flour standards, general milling information, history of the companies and employees, inventories, newspaper clippings, patent information, research, and one of the later important pieces of the corporation’s history: how the company eventually turned to Glu-X as a main product. Aerial view of the Ewing Mill in Brownstown, IN.
The Photographs Series (1900-2000) consists of four boxes of photographs and one box of glass negatives. It includes aerial views of the corporation, views of the mills, the after effects of a large snowfall, exhibits, and fires. Some of the photographs date back to 1900. This series is a picture book of change and innovation with photos ranging from horse and buggy to early automobiles, then on to large loading trucks. An interesting set of photos shows construction of the Ewing Blending Plant. With the photos in order, one can see each step of the construction from beginning to end. Not all photographs are business-related as there are family photos of each family member inside and outside the office. Notable family photos include a photo of Phil Robertson at the Smithsonian and photos of the Robertson's as boys and men.
Oversize Materials are stored in three boxes and includes newspaper clippings, Robertson Corporation abstract, loan application, mortgage, feed lists, equipment blue prints and printed material. Ewing, Indiana. Printed Material is the second largest series in the collection and is comprised of eight boxes. The largest section in this series is Articles that includes items from Milling and Baking, The Northwestern Miller, and Random Lengths. Brochures and pamphlets dot the landscape of printed material and include research findings from respected institutions or from attended research symposiums. Many of the magazine articles deal with World War II or the Russian grain embargo. There is also a collection of books pertaining to the history of milling and includes a copy of <emph render='italic'>The Robertson Corporation 1880-2000 </emph>written by R. R. Phil Robertson. Family member Richard S. "Dick" Robertson wrote <emph render='italic'>Recollections of My Life in Brownstown, Indiana</emph>, included in the collection. These recollections are snap shots of Dick's life in Brownstown. The Artifacts Series is stored in one box and includes flour slicks, commemorative coins, packaging bags for Glu-X and Triple-R dog food, and promotional items.
The Artifacts are stored within the department's Artifact Collection. Box 40 in this inventory lists the artifacts.

Roberston Corporation

Ernest R. Nichols papers

  • US US kmk U1990.27
  • Collection
  • 1900-1909

The Ernest R. Nichols Papers, 1900-1909, cover the years in which Nichols was president of the Kansas State Agricultural College. He had come to KSAC in 1890 as an instructor in the Department of Physics. When Thomas E. Will was removed from the presidency in 1899, Nichols was appointed acting president until 1900, when he was officially given the position. He was considered a strong administrator and was able to control the financial business of the college, which had been left to the individual departments before. Because of the financial losses and debts accumulated by the college, it became unfeasible for the practice to continue. Because of the firm grip on spending, and the increasingly authoritarian style of Nichols administration, some members of the faculty began to complain about their loss of effective control in college matters. The resentment increased through the years, and played a part in the resignation of Nichols. He resigned in 1908, effective July 1909, due to controversies and personality conflicts between himself and the faculty and Board of Regents.
The papers are organized in four series consisting of nine cubic feet. The papers are arranged chronologically within the series. The first series is incoming general correspondence, the second is outgoing correspondence, the third consists of materials concerning the Board of Regents, and the fourth series is secretary's office and miscellaneous. Within each chronological unit, the papers are arranged alphabetically with materials in the folders organized chronologically under each letter.
The papers in the collection consist primarily of general correspondence, including the following categories: advertisements, inquiries and applications by prospective students, letters concerning payment on the YMCA building fund for which Nichols was treasurer, and applications from teachers agencies and private individuals concerning college jobs. On several occasions, Booker T. Washington and staff members at Tuskegee Institute wrote Nichols, inquiring about candidates for openings at Tuskegee. Other areas included in the correspondence are Board of Regents, the Experiment Station at Hays, Farmers Institutes, discipline of students, pay raises, and letters from former faculty members, written in friendship, or occasionally in regards to payment delays.
The collection's strengths are limited to giving insight to student and faculty life at the turn of the century as well as a look at the material goods available at the time, evidenced by the many advertisements. Administrative paper work is included in one box, the material pertaining to the Board of Regents. Student and faculty grievances are interspersed throughout the collection, as are letters from minority students and graduates. The materials are not extensive concerning events, rather the papers tend to make short references to them.
Inconsistency is also a problem. The years 1905-1909 are nearly complete, however the early years of the collection, 1900-1904, are incomplete. The only major administrative problems documented in great detail are included in the Board of Regents materials. Prominent or recurring correspondence was received from Albert Teaching Agency, W. E. Blackburn, H. W. Calvin, Arthur Capper, M. A. Carelton, Wm. R. Carter, E. B. Cowgill, E. T. Fairchild, Harry Freese, J. G. Haney, Governor Hoch, H. G. Maxwell, J. S. McDowell, J. H. Miller, G. W. Owens, Capt. P. M. Shaffer, Governor Stubbs, A. M. Thurston, Dr. TenEyck, Albert Todd, J. O. Tulloss, Booker T. Washington, H. Z. Wilber, Davies Wilson.

Nichols, Ernest R.

Arthur H. Gilles World War I collection

  • US US kmk U2007.12
  • Collection
  • 1917-1918

After graduating from Kansas State Agricultural College in 1914, Gilles entered World War I in 1918. This collection spans the years 197 to 1919 and consists of five boxes.

Gilles, Arthur H.

Franklin A. Coffman papers

  • US US kmk P2011.10
  • Collection
  • 1884-1978

The Franklin A. Coffman papers contain letters, autobiographical materials, paternal and maternal family genealogies, legal documents, literary works, awards and honors, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks and photograph albums, and artifacts.
Personal correspondence is mainly amongst family members though there is a letter from J. Edgar Hoover regarding a poem Coffman published.  Business correspondence is sparse.  Coffman received a bound volume of congratulatory letters upon his retirement.  The letters provide the best account of Coffman's work with the United States Department of Agriculture within the collection.  Many describe interactions with Coffman during field work and visits to experiment stations across the country.  There is no official governmental correspondence in the collection documenting Coffman's work.
Coffman handwrote autobiographical accounts of his life during his later years.  These accounts are mainly of his childhood, college days and work in the Philippines.  The accounts covering the years Coffman spent in the Philippines are extensive.  They provide many details and impressions about the native people.  The accounts also cover his travels to other Asian countries while based in the Philippines.
Coffman spent years gathering genealogical information from relatives and researching his ancestors.  He traced his father's Coffman ancestors back to 1737 and his mother's Bayle ancestors back to 1796.  There are notes, different versions of family trees, and extensive narrative written by Coffman describing the lives of his ancestors.
Legal documents are sparse.
Coffman was a prolific poet.  There are clippings of poetry published in the Washington Post.  Some poems were published without his name.  Others have his initials, F.A.C., including two series of poems compiled in notebooks.  There are also unpublished poems.
There are certificates for scholarly and service awards and honors, and the registration certificate for the Marion Oat. There are not certificates for all the awards and honors listed on Coffman's resume.
There are just a few United States Department of Agriculture's bulletins and farmer's Bulletins that Coffman authored or co-authored.  The vast majority of Coffman's published research is not part of the collection.
One of Coffman's hobbies was photography.  There are hundreds of photographs documenting his personal and professional lives.  Subjects are wide-ranging. Coffman signed some of his photographs, mainly what he referred to as the "salon prints."  There are photographs taken by others including professional portraits and candid photographs of Coffman at various ages.  Many photographs are undated and unidentified.
There are seven scrapbooks containing photographs and memorabilia. 1) Photographs and memorabilia document a 10 day automobile trip to eastern cities and New England that Coffman took with his wife and daughter in 1936.  Expenses totaled $110.96.
2)  "The Farm" album contains photographs of family members, neighbors, friends, crops, farmhouse interiors and exteriors, Rocky Ford School, and Rocky Ford dam and mill.  The album is dated 1913 and some photographs are identified.  There are also approximately 56 photographs of Manhattan and Kansas State Agricultural College.  The subjects are the campus, buildings, classmates, lake recreation, train depot, street car, and a railroad bridge.  Some photos are identified and dated 1914.
3) This photo album with narrative is titled "The Many Faces of F.A.C." and is written by "A Couple of Norths and Shanghai Louis Kao."  It was compiled in 1962 and contains photographs of Coffman in various locations.
4) The album has photographs of Coffman's family and ancestors (earliest date 1884), Sunday school class, the First Baptist Church in 1902, Kansas State Agricultural College, and Manhattan.  There is extensive Kansas State Agricultural College memorabilia including a cadet corps certificate, 1908 fall term schedule, invitations, commencement programs, band programs, banquet programs, clippings and a baseball ticket.  The album also has correspondence and drawings.  The album has memorabilia from Coffman's transit back to the United States on the Shino Maru including menus and passenger list. There are photographs of the transit and memorabilia from a Hong Kong visit en route.  There are photographs of Kansas State Agricultural College, Oklahoma A&M and Akron, Colorado. 1916.
5) The Philippines album contains photographs of Coffman's trip across the western United States to board the S.S. Manchuria for transit to the Philippines.  Coffman photographed the Golden Gate Park,  the Panama Pacific International Exhibition grounds, onboard ship recreation, Honolulu, Tokyo, Nagasaki, the Philippines' countryside, Filipinos' daily activities, Philippine experiment stations, cultural activities, villages, Coffman's office and co-workers, YMCA sports,  Viscayia (German naval ship), Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kobe, Yamaa, Yokahoma,  the voyage back to the United States on the Shino Maru (not to be confused with the Shinyo Maru), Honolulu experiment station, Universal Film City, and the San Diego Exposition.  1914-1916.
6) The photographs and memorabilia in this album are compiled in honor of Coffman's brother, Will, who died in 1920.  It contains drawings, report cards, class schedule and photographs of Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, University of Kansas, and Will's travels. Loose commencement programs from Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913-1915, are with the album.
7)  The album contains photographs from Coffman's days in Akron and his travels to Amarillo, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Arlington, New York, Philadelphia and Mount Vernon from 1919-1922.  There is memorabilia from Washington, D.C., New York including a Metropolitan Opera House program and a Hippodrome souvenir book, Coffman's wedding and showers, and a program from the American Society of Agronomy 1922 meeting. Morrill, Kansas, Twin Oaks, Estes Park, county fairs, and Manhattan are also subjects of photographs.  Alta Johnson's School Girl Days: A Memory Book from Washington County High School, 1914, is boxed with the scrapbooks.
The most notable artifacts are four cameras, presumably used by Coffman:  Univex Model A, 1933; No. 1-A Kodak Junior Model A, 1914; No. 2 Folding Autographic Brownie, circa 1915-1916; Kodak Six-16 camera and leather case, circa 1932-1936.

Coffman, Franklin A.

American Council on Consumer Interests records

  • Collection
  • 1953-1983

The American Council on Consumer Interests (ACCI) records document the activities of the group from its beginning in 1953 through 1983.
The first series contains incoming and outgoing correspondence of the executive directors, Edward Metzen (1973-1976), Karen Stein (1975-1978), Mel Zelenak (1978-1982), and Barbara Slusher (1984- 1986). The correspondence pertains mainly to payment of membership dues, a proposed site relocation, 1978, and publications.
The second series, the board of directors, consists of minutes from board meetings and annual reports to the board from the executive directors (1976-1982).
The third series, committees, is one of the largest comprising forty-three folders. The executive committee sub-series (1956- 1982) contains correspondence, agendas, annual reports, and documents concerning annual business meetings, meetings, conference calls, and miscellaneous matters.
The membership committee (1972-1977) is the second sub-series and contains correspondence regarding membership in ACCI and a promotional manual. Conferences is another sizable series in the records. It spans the years 1953-1978 and is housed in one box. In this series is information about each annual conference including registration, program, finances, and planning.
The fifth series contains financial documents. It is divided into three sub-series; financial documents (1955-1983), grants (1963- 1981), and Internal Revenue Service (1967-1979). The first sub-series includes monthly, budget, and accountants reports, financial projections, and miscellaneous items. The grants sub-series contain information on grants applied for and/or received from Consumer's Union and the Office of Consumer Education. The third sub-series, Internal Revenue Service, has information pertaining to tax status, employee withholding, and miscellaneous tax information.
The last series contains miscellaneous material for the years 1965-1982. It concerns the following; ACCI history (a history of ACCI written by Henry Harap in 1969 is found here), an internship program that began with the Conference of Consumer Organizations, a booklet on lobbying by public interest charities, National Consumers Week, and testimonies from the Consumer Federation of America.

American Council on Consumer Interests

Faculty Senate records

  • Collection
  • 1950–2013

This collection primarily includes agendas and minutes from the Kansas State University Faculty Senate from 1950 to 2013. Also included are records from various committess including the Executive Committee, Academic Affairs, Academic Honesty, Academic Standards, Faculty Affairs, Library, Use of Rooms, and University Planning. Other records include election results, constitution, handbook, policies and procedures, and course and curriculum changes.

Faculty Senate

Abby Lindsey Marlatt papers

  • US US kmk U2012.21
  • Collection
  • 1874-1966

The Abby Lindsey Marlatt papers include records from her academic career and personal life. They are divided into series covering her academic work, personal life, correspondence, and publications and art.
The academic series covers her undergraduate coursework at Kansas State College (KSC), graduate work at the University of California-Berkeley, and employment as associate professor at KSC. Types of material included are assigned work, study materials, notes, quizzes, and exams. Also, this series contains items from her academic year teaching at the Beirut College for Women in Lebanon.
The materials in the personal series include documentation of her life outside academia, including information about her church, travel documents, newspaper clippings, and programs, as well as a few personal effects such as a driver's license, budget book, and guest register.
The correspondence series represents much of Abby’s adult life, although the bulk is from the late 1930s though the late 1950s. Exchanges with her parents and friends include letters, telegrams, and postcards covering topics that include her personal and professional activities, as well as social issues such as pacifism, race relations, rationing, and religion.
The publications and art series contains books and artwork from Abby's collection usually focused on Kansas and KSC.

Marlatt, Abby Lindsey

Page Family collection

  • US US kmk P2003.01
  • Collection
  • 1780-2004

The Correspondence Series (1834, 1845-1966) consists of twelve boxes and four sub-series.
The first sub-series are correspondence between family members and friends between the years 1834, and 1845 and 1966.  It consists of nine boxes and twenty additional file folders in box 10.
The second sub-series is Education and made up of one file folder.  Correspondence in this sub-series contains “pressure notes” to Olive and Mary Page when they attended Mt. Holyoke-Female Seminary wanting the twins to change their religious beliefs.
The third sub-series is Medical and is comprised of 33 file folders that contains correspondence that deal with Dr. William H. Page’s medical practice.
The fourth sub-series, Military, contains two file folders of World War I letters to Olive Page between 1918 and 1919.
The Art Series (1851-1852) consists of one cartoon that was created by Daniel Page when he was sent home from the Phillips Exeter Academy “because he did not know enough to enter the academy.”
The Cookery Series (ca. 1910-1920, undated) includes Mary Page Hastings undated manuscript cookbook.  This cookbook includes recipes for cream pies, feed for 40 hens and washing fluid.  Also in this series is a score card when Olive Page Rogers judged butter contests between 1910 and 1920.
The Education Series (1844-1929, undated) consists of school transcripts for Daniel Page from Phillips Exeter Academy, Florence Page from Newark Art School of Fine & Industrial Arts and Kingman Page from Bowdoin College.  Essays by Mary Page, Nina Page, and William Page are included.
The Family Series (1817, 1943-195[2], undated) consists of eighteen file folders. These folders include genealogical information, garden records, church membership, wedding gifts, funerals, marriages and school medical examination.
The Financial Series (1821-1948) is housed in fourteen file folders contains ledger books with minutes and legal information, receipts for payments to teachers, individual accounts, and financial documents pertaining to organizations and society pins.  A flat box includes an account book for pigs/hogs, horses, cattle, hens, sheep, wall paper for the Portland Street House, feed supplies, clothing, utilities, labor expenses, etc.
The Legal Series (1789-1947, undated) is comprised of real estate documents, deeds, a law suit that Alice Page filed against Daniel Page and Benjamin Page in the 1840s, and wills and estates.
The Literary Series (1823-1923, undated) consists of essays by William H. Page, Poetry by Beatrice Page, Mary Page Hastings and Minnie Hastings and Valentines to William Page and Huldah Page.
The Medical Series (1840s-1885) is made up of documents from William H. Page’s medical practice.  Items included are record books of patients, records of military recruits examined by Page at Boston during the Civil War, prescriptions, cures, and documents Page’s eye injury.
The Military Series (1861-1863) contains a discharge record book of Civil War soldiers from Massachusetts and New Hampshire.  This book provides the rank, company, regiment, state, residence, date of discharge, volume number and page number.
Printed Material (1839-1927) includes advertisement, announcements, annual reports, booklets about agriculture, medical, mining, silver ware and travel; a New Testament Bible belonging to Daniel Page; broadsides; calling card; invitations, and newspaper clippings.
Diaries Series (1854-1988) consists of 26 diaries.  The most prominent diaries in the collection were written by Nina E. Page, daughter of Dr. William H. Page, from 1911 to 1942.
Memo Notebooks Series (1874-1881; 1909; 1973; undated) is comprised of two Page family address books (1909 and 1973), an undated events book, and an autograph book.
Correspondence Series, Alphabetical, 1972-2004 and undated consists of correspondence to Carolyn Page and Roy Zarucchi and their business The Nightshade Press.
Correspondence Series, Chronological, 1834-1946 and undated is made up of handwritten correspondence between Page Family members.  These letters were not included in the original collection as Carolyn Page was using them for research.  This series also includes correspondence, 1847-1878 and undated, that are typewritten because they had been transcribed onto a CD.
Subject, 1851-2002 and undated, is comprised of information relating to some of the Page family members and information pertaining to The Nightshade Press such as press releases, poetry book reviews, and some authors who wrote for the journal.
The Financial Series, 1850-1947, is made up of Account and Note Books and financial information kept by Victor E. Page and Olive Page Rogers.  These accounts include prices of food, clothing and other household items purchased as well as crops and livestock bought and sold.
Legal Documents II, 1822-1912, consists of real estate records and deed, marriage records, wills, and estate records.  The most interesting items in this series are the wills and estate documents of Benjamin and Huldah Page.
Literary Works II consists of an incomplete manuscript by Carolyn Page titled <emph render='italic'>Homesteading in Desperate Times.</emph>  It was to be a book about the twins, Mary and Olive Page.  Mary married and moved to Missouri, while Olive taught school in Boston.  Often Mary wrote home asking Olive to send her old clothes so that she could sew clothes for her children.
Printed Material II, 1839-2000, includes articles, books published by The Nightshade Press, book reviews, hymn lyrics, The Nightshade Press journals from 1989 to 2000.
The Photograph Series consist of three (3) photographs: Daniel and Maggie Page, Dannie, Lilli and Nettie, and an unidentified person.
The Media Series consists of one Compact Disk (CD, undated).  This CD contains Page Family correspondence that has been transcribed.  Researchers should try to match the transcribed letter to the original handwritten if all possible for accuracy.
The Art Series II, 1930 and undated, consists of artwork by Carolyn Page, Anne Croom, Wilma Fulkerson, Ray Gengenbach, Florence Page Woodes, and Roy Zarucchi.
The Oversize Series, 1865-1889, 1986 and undated, is made up of three Physician Record books belonging to Dr. William H. Page and to Nina A. Page and some art work by Anne Croom, Ray Gengenback, Joe McLendon and Carolyn Page.
The Artifacts Series, 1889-1890, 1915 and undated includes a birthday card, calling card case, a medical prescription pad, two wallets – one black and one brown, and a wooden letter box.  There are also empty envelopes in this series that did not have correspondence attached.

Page Family

Thomas E. Will papers

  • US US kmk U2005.29
  • Collection
  • 1896-1909

The Thomas E. Will papers contain business correspondence, printed material, Board of Regents minutes, reports, legal documents, notes and drafts, and newspaper clippings from 1896 to 1909, some of which is connected to Will's time as president of Kansas State Agricultural College (KSAC) from 1899 to 1901. There are approximately 430 items in the collection, which is housed in one document box. The papers are divided into seven series: 1) correspondence, 2) minutes, 3) legal documents, 4) reports, 5) printed material, 6) financial records, and 7) notes and drafts.
Correspondence with Regents, KSAC executive department members, KSAC faculty and staff, and the governor of Kansas make up a large portion of the collection. Also among correspondence are letters between J. D. Walters and Will. Many of the letters deal with normal procedures at KSAC, however, some of the correspondence concerns the resignation of President Will. The series is contained in five folders.
Board of Regents minutes make up the second series and they are contained in a single folder. Among the minutes are reactions of Regents (especailly Carl Vrooman and Susan St. John) to the dismissal of President Will and other college professors. Legal documents are filed in one folder, and many of them are contracts written up by the Board of Regents for college faculty and staff. Some of the contracts are actually signed by the Regents, but many of them are blank forms. Other legal records consist of statements of college debts owed and changes within the Board of Regents.
Reports, the fourth series, concern the political controversies around populism that caused outrage in Manhattan and KSAC. The fifth series, printed material, makes up a large portion of the collection. Such items as programs and articles concerning KSAC, articles written by Will, a Kansas Supreme Court brief by G.C. Clemons, and newspaper clippings are included in this series. Financial documents include statements and expenditures concerning the treasury department of KSAC. Also included in this series are copies of the college deficits for the fiscal years 1886–1899. Notes and drafts make up the final series of this collection. The authorship of many of these handwritten items is unknown and they are difficult to read.

Will, Thomas E.

Women in Communications, Inc. records

  • Collection
  • 1985-1994

Women in Communications, inc., an honorary professional fraternity dedicated to empowering women in the communications professions, was founded in 1909 as Theta Sigma Phi at the University of Washington in Seattle. A local student chapter at Kansas State Agricultural College was petitioned by the Women's Press Club and accepted on June 8, 1916. It's original membership number 6 actives and 6 pledges. Theta Sigma Phi was created with dedication to the following objectives: To unite women engaging in or planning to engage in journalism; To confer honor upon women who distinguish themselves in journalism or letter; To achieve definite standards in journalism and letters; To improve working conditions for women in these fields; To inspire members to greater individual effort Some of the early Theta Sigs include: Velma Carson, Clementine Paddleford, Elizabeth Dickens Shafer, Josephine Hemphill, Velma Lockridge McKee, Alice C. Nichols, Sue Carmody Jones, and Eula Mae Currie Kelly. In 1972, the national organization officially changed it's name from Theta Sigma Phi to Women in Communications, inc. (WICI). At the same time, it reformulated the original objectives to be more in tune with modern times. WICI's mission is Leading Change, the membership coming together to make a difference in the world and the communications profession. The objectives of the organization are: To unite members for the purpose of promoting the advancement of women in all fields of communications; To work for the First Amendment rights and responsibilities of communicators; To recognize distinguished professional achievements; To promote high professional standards throughout the communications industry.

Kansas State University. Women in Communications Honorary Professional Fraternity

David Dary Papers

  • US US kmk P2011.13
  • Collection
  • 1856-2013

DAVID DARY PAPERS (1856-2013)
INTRODUCTION
David Dary donated his extensive collection of personal papers to the Morse Department of Special Collections in 2011.  The papers span the years 1856 to 2013 and are housed in 103 boxes comprising 90 linear feet of shelf space.
Dary was born and raised in Manhattan, his maternal great-grandfather having settled there in 1866.  All of his great-grandparents, grandparents, and parents, as well as other relatives, played active and prominent roles in the history of Manhattan. Dary graduated from Kansas State College in 1956 with a degree in speech, and the University of Kansas in 1970 with a master’s degree in journalism.
The papers reflect the various stages of Dary’s impressive professional career, along with his early activities as a magician followed by years as a short wave radio enthusiast.  His career in broadcast journalism, most notably for CBS and NBC in Washington, D.C. during the 1960s, led to positions in the schools of journalism at the University of Kansas and the University of Oklahoma, where he served as director.  His passion for history combined with his writing ability and style enabled Dary to become a major western historian with countless articles in newspapers and journals and over 20 books for which he has won numerous prestigious awards.
The Dary Papers include the most diverse number of research strengths than any other collection in the department.  Among the topics represented in the papers are Manhattan history, history of print and broadcast journalism, U.S. history and political science, history of Kansas and the West.
At the time of the donation, the K-State Libraries purchased Dary’s library containing approximately 4,000 titles.  Housed in special collections, its strengths mirror those of his papers.
The Family Series consists of three (3) boxes of material relating to David Dary’s family members. The family series is divided into several sub-series according to family members: Carl Engel (David’s great-grandfather on his mother’s side), Charles F. Engel (David’s great uncle), A.W. Long (David’s maternal grandfather and Manhattan City Mayor from 1909-1911), Milton Russell Dary (David’s father), Ruth Engel Long Dary (David’s mother and spouse to Milton Russell Dary), Sue Dary (David’s wife), and Cynthia Dary Rugolo and Carol Dary Pennington (David and Sue Dary’s daughters). Photographs of family members can be found in series 14, photography.
The Education Series is held in one (1) box. It contains material from David Dary’s days at Manhattan High School and Kansas State University (then Kansas State College). Dary graduated from Manhattan High School in 1952. Included in the high school material is documentation of Dary’s interest in being a magician and drummer. David attended Kansas State College from 1952-1956 where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Speech. Papers for this period include items related to K-State and his classes.
The Short Wave Radio series is made up of two (2) boxes of radio-related content belonging to David Dary. His first interest was in short-wave listening and later obtaining his FCC license as a radio amateur after trying to operate a very low-power radio station at his Manhattan home. they contain correspondence from other short-wave listeners and radio amateurs, photographs, QSL cards from short-wave broadcast stations around the world, and verifications to many stations he heard on his equipment. His files document radio activities from around the world and provide an insight into the history of short radio for several decades.
The Broadcast Journalism Career Series concentrates on this period of his career and consists of one (1) box of material. There are documents from Dary’s time at CBS (1960-1963) and NBC (1963-1967) including scripts, reports, staff directories, and other material. Dary covered the assassination of John F. Kennedy (included is the United Press wire report of the shooting in Dallas), the Cuban Missile Crisis, the inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson, and other key events. Related documentation can be found in other series including correspondence, Dary files, and photographs.
The Higher Education Career Series is made up of three (3) boxes. They contain information from David’s employment at the University of Kansas and the University of Oklahoma. He was a Professor in the School of Journalism at KU from 1970-1989. At OU, Dary was a Professor of Journalism and Director of H.H. School of Journalism and Mass Communication. He retired as Emeritus Gaylord Chair and Professor. Many of the files in the OU section pertain to the Gaylord family. Also included is documentation of Dary’s two visits to Sudan, 1988 and 1989, when he participated in a U. S. Information Agency program to teach Sudanese journalists about free press in a democracy.
The Correspondence Series is made up of seventeen (17) boxes of correspondence from individuals relating to different areas of interest: broadcast and print journalism, state and national governments, western history, publishing (history of the West in particular), universities of Kansas and Oklahoma, etc. The correspondents and subject matter basically relate to the various stages of Dary’s life and represent a “who’s who” in those fields. A few examples include Ed Bliss, David Boren, David Brinkley, Dan Casement, Don Goldsmith, Robert Hemenway, Richard Rogers, Dean Rusk, Pierre Salinger, Ed Turner, and Harry Truman. The contents are filed alphabetically by the correspondent’s last name.
While the files in the Correspondence Series concentrate on individuals and personalities, the fifteen (15) boxes in the Dary Files Series represent many of the subjects that Dary researched, wrote about, and collected. A large number of the files include those that Dary maintained according to historical topics and include correspondence, notes, newspapers and clippings, periodical articles, ephemera, maps, and photographs. These files are organized alphabetically.
The Business Records Series consists of two (2) boxes. The first box contains appraisals that Dary completed for numerous businesses and collectors and they remain closed to researchers at Dary’s request. The second box contains information from Dary’s book business dealing with out-of-print publications, 1969-1989. The material includes the catalogs he distributed that listed the items that he had for sale. Included are items relating to book fairs and collections. Dary also purchased and acquired many out-of-print and historically valuable items that are found in his papers and library.
The Speeches Series is made up of six (6) boxes with its contents arranged in chronological order by the date the speech was presented. The dates range from 1970-2013; the undated speeches are filed at the end. The titles (if provided) and location of the speeches are also listed. The over 160 speeches preserved in the files cover a wide variety of topics, the history of the West and Kansas in particular. They offer researchers the results of his research and experience associated with numerous subjects; the audiences ranged from members of professional organizations to civic clubs.
The Publication Files Series is housed in twenty-six (26) boxes divided into fifteen sub-series. The first twelve document a number of Dary’s books, including The Buffalo Book, Cowboy Culture, Entrepreneurs of the Old West, Frontier Medicine, Lawrence: An Informal History, Oklahoma Stories, Oregon Trail, Red Blood, and Black Ink, Seeking Pleasures in the Old West, The Santa Fe Trail, Stories of Old-Time Oklahoma, and True Tales of the Prairies and the Plains. They document his research and approach to writing and publishing major works on western history and the history of the state of Oklahoma. The final three boxes are divided into miscellaneous, illustrations, and literary works and research. They include files on illustrations for several of Dary’s books and research files.
The Certificates and Awards Series is contained in one (1) box. They represent certificates and awards presented to Dary, some of which are among the highest honors an author can receive. They include a Wrangler Award from the National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, and a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Alfred A. Knopf publishing company nominated Cowboy Culture for a Pulitzer Prize. Also included are three certificates related to the field of medicine that Gilbert Dary received, 1895-1902.
The Ephemera Series consists of two (2) boxes of items in various formats. It includes items that Dary collected over the years that fall into the categories of autographs, broadsides, correspondence, financial, printed material, and wire service. Some items of prominence include autographs of Kansas Governor, documents dating from Kansas Territory days, and the wire service account of the coronation of Queen Elizabeth. In addition, there is a collection of William Robert Smith letters that Dary purchased because of its historical interest. Smith (1863-1924) was a lawyer, judge, and U.S. congressman from Texas. He served as judge of the 32nd Judicial District of Texas, 1897-1903. He was elected to the U.S. Congress as a Democrat and served 1903-1917 after which President Woodrow Wilson appointed him the U.S. district judge for the Western District of Texas. The letters span the years 1890-1924.
The Printed Material Series, housed in two (2) boxes, is divided into seven subseries: 1) Early Journalism Career, 2) Career in Education-University of Kansas, 3) Career in Education-University of Oklahoma, 4) Writing Related Material, 5) Personal, and 6) Subject. They include a variety of formats and contain material associated with Dary’s early journalism career, years at Kansas University and the University of Oklahoma, a variety of items related to writing, personal activities, and subjects. Researchers are encouraged to look at the container list in order to gain a better perspective of the holdings in this series.
The Photograph Series is held in six (6) boxes divided into subseries according to family members. The first subseries on the Carl Engel family includes Manhattan photos of Norman Engel’s store, family homes, and other miscellaneous family views. In the Charles F. Engel section, there are photos of the Engel hardware store and log cabin. The third subseries covers A.W. Long’s family. It includes photos of family homes, the Long Oil Company, and family photos. The Milton Russell Dary photos include family, Poyntz Avenue, and the family home. David Dary’s subseries includes photos from both his career and personal life. His career photos include portraits of news reporters he worked with or knew; Dary’s own portrait, and photos from conferences/meetings/seminars. Photos from his personal life include those of his family and his home. The stereoviews (1880-1906) provide early views of Manhattan and the surrounding area including the family home and garden scenes. The subject series contains photos acquired by Dary and include notables such as Dwight Eisenhower and Harry Truman making “whistle stops” in Manhattan, Kansas [expand the number of examples].
The Audiovisual Series is contained in one (1) box and includes CDs, DVDs, Tapes, and slides.
The Oversize Series is housed in fifteen (15) boxes and several large folders filed in the oversize flat drawer cabinet; the locations are noted in the container list. This series contains material divided into nine subseries: 1) photographs; 2) scrapbooks; 3) maps; 4) posters; 5) artwork; 6) newspapers; 7) magazines; 8) certificates/diplomas/awards; 9) and other. The oversize material is housed in either large folders or oversize boxes. The photographs contain images of family as well as a few miscellaneous photos, such as the Popcorn Man. There are twenty-three scrapbooks in the oversize series. Four of the scrapbooks belong to Ruth Engel Long Dary (Dary’s mother) and cover the time she was attending Kansas State Agricultural College (circa 1926). Two belong to M. Russell Dary. And another two relate to M. Russell Dary and his marriage to Ruth Engel Long Dary, a guest list and anniversary memory book. Two are personal scrapbooks of Charles Engel and A.W. Long, respectively. Thirteen of the scrapbooks relate to David Dary, spanning from his birth to college to the publication of his articles. The maps section includes maps primarily over cattle trails and the frontier and there is also a large collection of Kanzana maps. The artwork and posters are housed in one box and one folder. They include artwork collected by David, covering mostly western topics, and posters from events, such as an NCAA final four game and movie posters. The oversize newspapers are separated into originals and facsimiles from sources such as the New York Times, the Kansas Republic News, etc. The magazines are all originals and include Life magazine, Kansas City Star Sunday magazine, Chicago Tribune, Collier’s magazine, and Midway. In the Certificates/Diplomas/Awards subseries there are items belonging to Gilbert Dary, Russell M. Dary, A.W. Long, and David Dary. The other category is a random assortment of items, such as a calendar, press passes, and table displays.

Dary, David (1934-   )

Daniel M. Braum papers

  • US US kmk P2005.07
  • Collection
  • 1935-1998

The Daniel M. Braum Papers document the professional career of Braum from 1940-1965.  They also include information about his personal activities and family during that time as well as after his death in 1981 when the information was added to the collection by the family covering the years 1982-1998.   

The bulk of the collection consists of information regarding his involvement with the advancement of farm work simplification, scientific management, and public administration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, General Services Administration, University of the Philippines, and Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service. The papers contain both personal and business correspondence received from numerous people throughout Braum’s life. Braum is the author of A Thousand Questions on Supervision in the Philippines, and a typescript of the book is preserved in the collection.

The Braum Papers are divided into eight series: 1) Correspondence, 1935-1991; 2) Subjects, 1943-1998; 3) Literary Works; 4) Organizations and Conferences, 1948-1958; 5) Certificates, Awards, Diplomas 1924-1978; 6) Printed Material, 1938-1957; 7) Photographs; and 8) Over Size.

The first series, Correspondence (1935-1991), is divided into two subseries.  The first includes both business and personal correspondence received from numerous people throughout Braum’s life.  The letters are organized alphabetically and include correspondence from Roberta Braum and John H. and Mary Ann (Loughridge) Braum.  The series contains numerous letters with Dr. Lillian Gilbreth that involves their work with farm work simplification, as well as personal matters after Daniel and Roberta Braum became close friends with Gilbreth.  Gilbreth became known as the “mother of modern management” and, with her husband, Frank pioneered industrial management techniques that are still practiced.  Correspondence with Dan Copell, E.C Young, Lowell Hardin, the farm work simplification project director and a number of other individuals also address Braum’s involvement with farm work simplification.  White House correspondence includes a small number of invitations and personal notes sent to Braum by Presidents Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter.  The second subseries contains general correspondence and is organized chronologically from 1935-1975.  The majority of these letters are related to Braum’s professional career and his involvement with farm work simplification, public administration, and scientific management.  The letters also address a number of committees and conferences Braum was involved with throughout his career including the Executive Committee, Agricultural Committee, and the Agricultural Management Conference at Purdue.

Subjects (1943-1998) is divided into 10 subseries: 1) The Braum Family contains newspaper clippings and articles concerning Bill Braum and other Braum family members; 2) Denison, Kansas History includes information about the history of the town; 3) Farm Work Simplification involves reports, literary works, and other information including course outlines and material, charts/graphs, and printed material outlining Braum’s involvement in the development of farm work simplification; 4) Lillian Gilbreth contains biographical information and printed material about Dr. Gilbreth and her work with time and motion study analysis; 5) Lectures consists of a class orientation lecture and a lecture series given in 1949; 6) Open Door Policy (1946) includes the policy and contract used when this program was established; 7) Philippines contains documents and other papers including Braum’s literary works from his time spent teaching in that country; 8) Semantics (1948-1949) includes course material and information on semantics taught at Purdue University; 9) Scientific Management and Christianity consists of 3 papers written by Braum on the subject and also his notes and Christian publications; and 10) Management involves literary works by Braum on management applied to the home, management development, and labor management, also includes Braum’s notes on the topic and charts/graphs.

The third series, Literary Works, contains two important works written by Braum.  The first is entitled “A Peaceful Approach to Work.”  A number of abstracts, critiques, and drafts are included.  Also, a complete typescript of Braum’s book A Thousand Questions on Supervision in the Philippines is retained in this series.

The series Organizations and Conferences consists of seven subseries.  The first is the American Society of Mechanical Engineers that includes information about the Farm Management Committee set up by Braum in 1948.  The second, Bureau of Ships, contains papers on leadership and communication.  The third sub-series is the International Committee of Scientific Management (CIOS) and contains a day book written by Braum while attending one of its conferences in Paris in 1957.  The fourth is the International Management Conference.  It contains papers written by Braum to be presented at the 8th and 9th Conferences.  The fifth subseries contains the Purdue Farm Cardiac Project (1958).  The sixth, The Society for the Advancement of Management, houses information and papers on the advancement of management.  The final subseries includes miscellaneous papers and documents from unidentified organizations and/or conferences.

The Certificates, Awards, and Diplomas series contains eleven certificates, awards, and diplomas Braum received throughout his lifetime.  The series includes certificates of merit from the USDA, ten and twenty-year service awards from the USDA, and a certificate of recognition from Ronald Reagan and the National Republican Party for Braum’s service to the Republican Party.

Printed Material, the sixth series, contains various items that are related to most of the other series or subseries.  These include Farm Work Simplification, the Philippines, International Committee of Scientific Management, the International Management Conference, Scientific Management, and a copy of Braum’s book A Thousand Questions on Supervision in the Philippines.

The Photographs series contains several hundred images including those of the Braum family, Philippines, China, Hong Kong, USDA, International Management Conference, International Committee on Scientific Management, and miscellaneous.  They provide excellent pictorial documentation of family members and the locations where Braum worked.

The final series, Over Size, contains photographs, certificates, awards, diplomas, posters, photo albums, and memorabilia from Braum’s life including an audiotape of Dr. Lillian Gilbreth and a photograph album that includes photographs from Braum’s service in World War I and other personal and family photographs.

Included with the papers were nineteen books from Daniel and Roberta Braum, many of which were signed and presented to them by the authors.  They have been cataloged and added to the library of the University Archives.

Braum, Daniel M.

Velma L. Carson papers

  • US US kmk P1984.10
  • Collection
  • 1886-1986

The Velma L. Carson Papers comprises of correspondence, records, and photographs of her personal life, academic, and professional careers. The collection is divided into eight series: Manuscripts, Poems, Magazines and Published Articles, Correspondence, Photographs, Drawings, Biographical, Subject, and Artifacts.
The manuscripts of this collection contain scripts from plays, documentaries, and stories written by Velma Carson. Some of these manuscripts provide information regarding "Operation Democracy," a pageant called "Message to Feves," and original stories and essays were written by Velma Carson. The poems in this collection are original poems written by Velma Carson about various topics throughout her lifetime. Magazines and Published Articles consist of newspaper and magazine articles and clippings from her life. There are also a few of her own publications and works that she published during her career as a journalist and writer. The largest portion of this collection is correspondence. This series is organized mostly in chronological order and consists of letters, cards, and postcards. The correspondence is mainly between Velma and her family and friends. The earliest letter is from 1915 and the latest is 1984. This covers her time at Kansas State in 1915 all the way to when she was awarded her degree in 1982. The photographs of this collection include a variety of photos of Velma Carson, her friends, and her family over the course of her life. The drawings are several small pieces created by Velma Carson.  The biographical series includes nine folders of information on Velma, two folders of information on Winona Carson, and three folders on Viola and Edward Carson. The subject series is made up of four folders that include information on Belva Lockwood, Wayne Randall, Morganville United Methodist Church, and Clay County taxes.  The artifacts include wallpaper and fabric samples, E. L. Carson's black leather wallet, stamps, a small toy monkey, a small puzzle, a copy of a Ten Dollar Confederate bill used as an advertisement for Joe Kay as Sheriff, and a Cigar Box.

Carson, Velma L.

Office of Student Activities and Services records

  • Collection
  • 1946-2013

The records of the Office of Student Activities and Services (OSAS) at Kansas State University span from 1946 to 2013. The office oversees student organziations on campus, including the Student Governing Association, and contents relate to the administration of student activities and services by the office, as well as Student Governing Association (SGA) records and information about student organizations.
SGA records include agendas, minutes, election information, and legislation and statutes of the student senate. Agendas include some years between 1998-1999 and 2003-2004. Minutes cover most years between 1946-1947 and 1996-1997. Election information is from 1989-1990 to 1992-1993. Legislation and statutes span from 1967-1968 to 2008-2009. Additional types of materials include reports, fine arts council annual reports, committee documentation, and budget and allocation records from some years between 1995-1996 and 2005-2006.
A small portion of the materials relate to student government efforts to save Nichols Gym between 1975 and 1984, and include correspondence, reports, a petition, flyers, clippings, and materials related to the Nichols Hall art competition. People frequently appearing in the collection include Greg Musil, Larry Weigel, Eric Bransby, and many faculty and administrators at the university.
OSAS records include the office newsletter, "Paper Money Plus," from 1972 to 1992, as well as reports, procedures and guidelines, and budget items from 2006 to 2012. Much of the latter content focuses on fiscal procedures, financial reports, and budget allocations for student organizations.
The largest series of records are student organization registration records, which are in alphabetical order. Included are names of officer, constitutions, bylaws, and similar types of information.

Office of Student Activities and Services

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