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Office of the President letterpress copybooks

  • Collection
  • 1871–1901

These thirty-four (34) volumes of letterpress copybooks document presidential and college administration correspondence at Kansas State Agricultural College, now Kansas State University, between 1871 and 1901. Only one volume is incoming correspondence and the remaining volumes are copies of outgoing correspondence. The following is a list of the volumes with the order of each line thus: current volume number and type of correspondence, description and date(s), and old volume number.
Vol. 1 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1879–1884 (and Regents Secretary Elbridge Gale, 1871–1873) (old vol. 1), available at <extref href='http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34956'>http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34956</extref>.
Vol. 2 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1880–1882 (old vol. 2)
Vol. 3 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1882–1883 (old vol. 3), available at <extref href='http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34957'>http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34957</extref>.
Vol. 4 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1883–1885 (old vol. 4)
Vol. 5 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild and secretary, 1884–1886 (old vol. 5)
Vol. 6 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1885–1886 (old vol. 6)
Vol. 7 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1886–1888 (old vol. 7, possibly not numbered)
Vol. 8 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1886–1889 (old vol. 8)
Vol. 9 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1888–1889 (old vol. 9)
Vol. 10 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1889–1890 (old vol. 10)
Vol. 11 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1890–1891 (old vol. 11)
Vol. 12 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1891–1892 (old vol. 12)
Vol. 13 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1892 (old vol. 13)
Vol. 14 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1892–1893 (old vol. 14)
Vol. 15 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1894 (old vol. 15)
Vol. 16 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1894–1895 (old vol. 16)
Vol. 17 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1895–1896 (old vol. 17), available at <extref href='http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34958'>http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34958</extref>.
Vol. 18 outgoing presidential correspondence, President George T. Fairchild, 1896–1897, and President Thomas E. Will, 1897–1898 (old vol. 18)
Incoming correspondence, former president George T. Fairchild, 1897–1899 (old vol. 19), available at <extref href='http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34959'>http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34959</extref>.
Vol. 19 outgoing presidential correspondence, President Thomas E. Will (Will, Vol. I), 1897 (old vol. 20)
Vol. 20 outgoing presidential correspondence, President Thomas E. Will (Will, Vol. II), 1897 (old vol. 21)
Vol. 21 outgoing presidential correspondence, President Thomas E. Will and secretary (Will, Vol. III), 1897–1899 (old vol. 24), available at <extref href='http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34960'>http://krex.k-state.edu/dspace/handle/2097/34960</extref>.
Vol. 22 outgoing presidential correspondence, President Thomas E. Will and secretary (Will, Vol. IV), 1898 (old vol. 22)
Vol. 23 outgoing presidential correspondence, President Thomas E. Will and secretary (Will, Vol. V), 1898–1899 (old vol. 23)
Vol. 1 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary (to president) Ira Graham, 1888–1891 (old vol. 25)
Vol. 2 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary (to president) Ira Graham, 1890–1897 (old vol. 26)
Vol. 3 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary (to president) Ira Graham, 1891–1893 (old vol. 27)
Vol. 4 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary (to president) Ira Graham, 1897–1898 (old vol. 28)
Vol. 5 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary to president, 1898–1901 (old vol. 29)
Vol. 6 outgoing secretarial correspondence, Secretary to president, 1899 (old vol. 30)
Vol. 1 outgoing loan commissioner correspondence, KSAC loan commissioner, 1871–1872 (old vol. 31)
Vol. 2 outgoing loan commissioner correspondence, KSAC loan commissioner, 1872–1879 (old vol. 32)
Vol. 3 outgoing loan commissioner correspondence, KSAC loan commissioner, 1882–1891 (old vol. 33)
Outgoing treasurer’s correspondence, KSAC treasurer's office, 1893–1895 (old vol. 34)

Office of the President

Robertson Corporation records

  • Collection
  • 1874-2009

The Correspondence Series is comprised of two boxes that extend over an 81-year period, starting in 1913 and ending in 2004 and arranged in alphabetical order. Majority of correspondence relate to the purchase of milling equipment such as elevators, dryers, flour packers, and sifters; the purchase of the Lemon Mill in Bedford, Indiana and the Ginger Feed and Elevator Company, Jeffersonville, Indiana; the sale of the company’s products such as corn meal, dog food, flour, livestock feed, and Glu-X; and the sale of the Seymour Mill. Correspondence between Phil Robertson and G. Terry Sharer, discusses historical milling machinery the Robertson Corporation donated to the Smithsonian in 1979. In 1980, Phil Robertson attended a reception hosted by the Smithsonian on the acceptance of the historical machinery. Equipment donated to the Smithsonian Institute.
The Financial Records are house in six boxes. Five boxes, 1928-2004, are filed in alphabetical order. They include annual meetings with statements of profit and loss, account ledgers, accountant's compilation report, auditors compilation report, balance sheets, cash flow statements, capital investments, estate transfers, financial statements, income tax basis, income tax returns, purchase orders from companies such as Advance Fabricators, Bearings Incorporation, Creason Corrugating, and Insects Limited, and sales and production figures. One box consists of the 1959 Ewing Mill appraisal, a Peoples bankbook, cash books, check stubs, financial ledgers, a payroll ledger from 1916 to 1917, production ledgers, sales slips, and a 1916 shipment register.
Minutes are stored in four boxes. (1960-1997, 2007-2009) are stored in two boxes and give insight on the daily, weekly, monthly and yearly goals of the Robertson Corporation. Each set of minutes contain travel plans, the price of crops on the market and a general overview of the company. There are two boxes of formal minutes in minute books (1960-2009).
The Subject Series (1874, 1881-2004) is the largest of all of the series. It is housed in nine boxes and contains insurance policies, newspaper clippings and class notes from when Joe E. Robertson attended Kansas State University in the 1940s. Listed alphabetically, the series covers the purchase and sale of mill property and equipment, contracts, events, feed and grain, flour standards, general milling information, history of the companies and employees, inventories, newspaper clippings, patent information, research, and one of the later important pieces of the corporation’s history: how the company eventually turned to Glu-X as a main product. Aerial view of the Ewing Mill in Brownstown, IN.
The Photographs Series (1900-2000) consists of four boxes of photographs and one box of glass negatives. It includes aerial views of the corporation, views of the mills, the after effects of a large snowfall, exhibits, and fires. Some of the photographs date back to 1900. This series is a picture book of change and innovation with photos ranging from horse and buggy to early automobiles, then on to large loading trucks. An interesting set of photos shows construction of the Ewing Blending Plant. With the photos in order, one can see each step of the construction from beginning to end. Not all photographs are business-related as there are family photos of each family member inside and outside the office. Notable family photos include a photo of Phil Robertson at the Smithsonian and photos of the Robertson's as boys and men.
Oversize Materials are stored in three boxes and includes newspaper clippings, Robertson Corporation abstract, loan application, mortgage, feed lists, equipment blue prints and printed material. Ewing, Indiana. Printed Material is the second largest series in the collection and is comprised of eight boxes. The largest section in this series is Articles that includes items from Milling and Baking, The Northwestern Miller, and Random Lengths. Brochures and pamphlets dot the landscape of printed material and include research findings from respected institutions or from attended research symposiums. Many of the magazine articles deal with World War II or the Russian grain embargo. There is also a collection of books pertaining to the history of milling and includes a copy of <emph render='italic'>The Robertson Corporation 1880-2000 </emph>written by R. R. Phil Robertson. Family member Richard S. "Dick" Robertson wrote <emph render='italic'>Recollections of My Life in Brownstown, Indiana</emph>, included in the collection. These recollections are snap shots of Dick's life in Brownstown. The Artifacts Series is stored in one box and includes flour slicks, commemorative coins, packaging bags for Glu-X and Triple-R dog food, and promotional items.
The Artifacts are stored within the department's Artifact Collection. Box 40 in this inventory lists the artifacts.

Roberston Corporation

Abby Lindsey Marlatt papers

  • Collection
  • 1874-1966

The Abby Lindsey Marlatt papers include records from her academic career and personal life. They are divided into series covering her academic work, personal life, correspondence, and publications and art.
The academic series covers her undergraduate coursework at Kansas State College (KSC), graduate work at the University of California-Berkeley, and employment as associate professor at KSC. Types of material included are assigned work, study materials, notes, quizzes, and exams. Also, this series contains items from her academic year teaching at the Beirut College for Women in Lebanon.
The materials in the personal series include documentation of her life outside academia, including information about her church, travel documents, newspaper clippings, and programs, as well as a few personal effects such as a driver's license, budget book, and guest register.
The correspondence series represents much of Abby’s adult life, although the bulk is from the late 1930s though the late 1950s. Exchanges with her parents and friends include letters, telegrams, and postcards covering topics that include her personal and professional activities, as well as social issues such as pacifism, race relations, rationing, and religion.
The publications and art series contains books and artwork from Abby's collection usually focused on Kansas and KSC.

Marlatt, Abby Lindsey

Harriet Parkerson Papers

  • Collection
  • 1874-2007

The Harriet Parkerson papers contain writings for the Domestic Science Club (some were not presented), financial records in the forms of receipts and cancelled checks and a copy of the published version of her sister's, Julie Etta Parkerson Reynolds 1874 journal.  The papers are housed in two boxes.
Literary Works makes up the bulk of the collection and contains papers Harriet wrote to present to the Domestic Science Club and one paper written by Ellen Goodnow.  For the most part, these presentations are random topics that the women appear to have picked themselves.  They bridge a wide array of subject matter and are all not focused on the matters of what people would tend to think of as Domestic Science.  While Harriet wrote about topics such as baking, soaps and soap making, and wardrobe maintenance, she also wrote about historical figures like Anne Louise Germaine Necker, Leo Tolstoy, and Michael Faraday.  One of the more interesting items from this series is the story of Soonboonagen Ammal, a female martyr from India.
The Financial Series contain receipts and cancelled checks.  The receipts are organized chronologically and are mostly from the years between 1909 and 1912.  Many of the receipts are for magazine subscriptions and rental of a post office box.  Other receipts are for necessities and items such as landscaping, flowers, and oats.  The cancelled checks are from three different banks and sorted alphabetically by bank.  The checks are from the financial institutions First National Bank, Mahattan State Bank, and Union National Bank.  The checks are mostly made out to individuals including her nephew Louis and herself (checks labeled "myself"); a few are aslo written out to institutions or businessess like Kansas State Agricultural College, Montgomery Wards, and Kimball Printing Co.
Printed Material is made up of Harriet's sister's, Julie Etta Parkerson Reynolds 1874 Journal, an agricultural magazine, the 1936-1937 Domestic Science Club booklet, and a few newspaper clippings.
The Department of Special Collections has Harriet Parkerson's journal on microfilm and the original is located at the Kansas State Historical Society in Topeka, Kansas.  Additional information about Harriet can be found in the History Index located in Special Collections.

Parkerson, Harriet

Rogler Ranch records

  • Collection
  • 1874-1988

This collection documents the activities of the Henry Rogler family and the Rogler Ranch Incorporation, also known as Pioneer Bluffs Ranch, from 1874 to 1993.  It contains information on the family history, family correspondence, corporate records, photographs and the Tallgrass Prairie.
Family History series is comprised of one (1) box and includes information pertaining to the personal lives of family members separate from the work of the ranch.  Included are obituaries, family stories, marriages, divorces, Henry Rogler as Kansas Legislator and Wayne Rogler’s time as a Senator.
There is a wealth of information in the six and one-half (6.5) boxes of Family Correspondence Series.  This series has two sections.  One is arranged alphabetically and the other is chronological by decades.  The alphabetical section has information pertaining to the life on the ranch, college life, married life, individuals living in other states, grandchildren, anniversary cards, birthday cards and sympathy cards.  The chronological section is made up of correspondence written to Helen Rogler, Henry and Maud Rogler and Wayne Rogler from their friends and associates.
The Ranch Records Series (1925-1988) consists of fifty-three (53) boxes and is the largest part of the collection.  It includes ranch records beginning in 1894, while Henry Rogler was living with his parents, Charles W. and Mary Mariah Satchell Rogler.  Included are account ledgers and journals (1894-1900; 1920-1959), cattle book records (1960-1973) and yearly records (1925-1988).  There is a gap in the account ledgers and journals between 1901 and 1919.  The early yearly records between 1925 and 1948 are not complete.  The records include some banking information on cattle bought and sold, the inventory of cattle, feed purchases, land leased from other ranchers and farmers, correspondence to ranchers, farmers, and companies, monthly bills and taxes showing what was spent on operating the ranch and a list of employees.
The Tallgrass Prairie Series (1957-1984, undated) is made up of six (6) file folders in one-half (.5) of a box.  Tallgrass Prairie vehicle bumper stickers and postcards were removed from this series and placed in the Artifact Series.
The Photograph Series (1882-1987, undated) consists of one and one-half (1.5) boxes.  Included are members of the Rogler family and Kansas State University class photographs from 1898 to 1902, cattle, grass and oil leaks.  There are also three (3) photograph books that include photographs of the Rogler family and the ranch.
The Scrapbook Series (1918-1978) consists of three (3) scrapbooks in two and one-half boxes (2.5).  Scrapbook one (1) includes newspaper clippings about Wayne Rogler, the Bluestem Prairie and Henry and Maud Rogler.  Scrapbook two (2) contains newspaper clippings about Kansas History and the Rogler family.  Scrapbook three (3) contains newspaper clippings, cards and letters to Henry and Maud Rogler on their 50<emph render='super'>th</emph>, 60<emph render='super'>th</emph>, and 65<emph render='super'>th</emph> wedding anniversaries.
The Artifact Series (1934, 1951, 1958-1959, 1981, undated) contains blank postcards that Henry and Maud Rogler and Wayne and Elizabeth Rogler collected on their travels.  Also included in this series is a dried corsage that Maud Rogler wore on her 50<emph render='super'>th</emph> wedding anniversary on July 21, 1951.  There are two (2) envelopes with clips of human hair belonging to Susan Ferris Sauble, mother of Maud Rogler, and Helen Rogler, daughter of Henry and Maud Rogler.
The Rogler Ranch Records have been assigned Accession Number P1993.12.

Tessie Agan papers

  • Collection
  • 1875-1984

This collection includes biographical information, correspondence, research materials, photographic materials, and other documentation of Tessie Agan and her professional studies, especially related to farm home design, space utilization, urban renewal, and aging. It contains pamphlets on proper design of a farm home with other printed materials devoted to kitchens, living rooms, dining areas, cupboards, storage walls, and proper lighting. The collection also contains studies on the amount of time and labor spent on laundry and cleaning the bathroom, as well as the benefits of "garbage grinders" in a kitchen. Other areas of the collection are devoted to public housing needs for elderly and diverse populations, space requirements for preschool children, and research on children from a social service perspective.

Agan, Tessie

George Washington Owens papers

  • Collection
  • 1875-1950

The Owens Papers (1890-1946) contain ten items consisting of a scrapbook, two diplomas, two certificates, and five photographs. They were donated to the University Archives by his daughter, Ana Elnora Owens. The scrapbook contains a handwritten autobiography (20 pages) and a "History of Agricultural Instruction in Virginia" (14 pages), both written in 1945-1946. Owens' autobiography describes his childhood in Kansas (near Alma in Wabaunsee County) and his experience at Kansas State Agricultural College as the first Black person to graduate from the institution in 1899. It provides a description of his employment at Tuskegee Institute after graduation where he worked under Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver. He left Tuskegee in 1908 to take a position at the Virginia Normal and Industrial School (Virginia State College) in Petersburg where he had a very successful career.
His writings describe the agricultural program at the school and his work in Virginia as the leader in vocational agriculture, including his organizational efforts for the New Farmers of Virginia that became the New Farmers of America. He provides an extensive list of others who were involved in vocational agriculture throughout the state. The two diplomas were awarded at the time of his graduation from high school in Wabaunsee County, Kansas in 1890, and Kansas State Agricultural College in 1899 where he obtained a bachelor of science degree in the "general course." The two certificates in the collection were awarded by Virginia State College. The first is a "Certificate of Merit" for ten years of service in 1945 and the second in appreciation for his teaching and service presented by the Alumni Association in 1946. Two of the five photographs show Owens as a student at KSAC in 1899 (one in his cadet uniform), two with his wife, Waddie Hill (a wedding photo in 1901 and another in 1903 with their newborn child), and one taken at the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute in 1920.

Owens, George Washington

Bonnie Baringer Coryell Hatch papers

  • US US kmk 2019-20.006
  • Collection
  • 1877 - 2010

Five boxes containing the papers of Bonnie Baringer Coryell Hatch, an educator, and homemaker in Kansas and Oklahoma between the early 1920s and 2010. Papers include letters, photographs, diaries, daybooks, ephemera, oral history cassette tapes, and other items. Letters and related materials reflect life in Depression-era Kansas and Oklahoma, and touch on education, politics, farming practices and home-making activities undertaken by Bonnie, her husband, Allen, her three sons, her sister, Donis, and her parents, Sylvester and Minnie Baringer. Among the correspondence files is a large collection of Bonnie’s letters to her parents and smaller groups of letters between Bonnie and Allen, Bonnie and her second husband, Homer Hatch, and Sylvester and Minnie. Included in Sylvester’s correspondence, some dating to the late 1890s, are letters related to his activities as a Kansas Master Farmer and Kansas legislator from Coffey County from 1943-1951. Also in the collection is a printed copy and PDF file of "Letters from the Heartland," a compilation of Bonnie’s letters to her parents transcribed and edited by Janet L. Coryell.

Hatch, Bonnie Baringer Coryell

Pat Patton collection

  • Collection
  • 1880–2008

This collection is composed of materials that were gathered and donated by department staff member Pat Patton and includes artifacts, photographs, articles, books, scrapbooks, and other memorabilia related to the history of Kansas State University between the late 1880s and 2008. The materials described in the container list include 1) research topics of Ms. Patton, such as Minnie Howell Champe (first African American woman to graduate from K-State) and the local chapter of Phi Beta Sigma, and 2) items she collected, including athletics materials and documentation of student life and culture.

Patton, Patricia A.

Franklin A. Coffman papers

  • Collection
  • 1884-1978

The Franklin A. Coffman papers contain letters, autobiographical materials, paternal and maternal family genealogies, legal documents, literary works, awards and honors, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks and photograph albums, and artifacts.
Personal correspondence is mainly amongst family members though there is a letter from J. Edgar Hoover regarding a poem Coffman published.  Business correspondence is sparse.  Coffman received a bound volume of congratulatory letters upon his retirement.  The letters provide the best account of Coffman's work with the United States Department of Agriculture within the collection.  Many describe interactions with Coffman during field work and visits to experiment stations across the country.  There is no official governmental correspondence in the collection documenting Coffman's work.
Coffman handwrote autobiographical accounts of his life during his later years.  These accounts are mainly of his childhood, college days and work in the Philippines.  The accounts covering the years Coffman spent in the Philippines are extensive.  They provide many details and impressions about the native people.  The accounts also cover his travels to other Asian countries while based in the Philippines.
Coffman spent years gathering genealogical information from relatives and researching his ancestors.  He traced his father's Coffman ancestors back to 1737 and his mother's Bayle ancestors back to 1796.  There are notes, different versions of family trees, and extensive narrative written by Coffman describing the lives of his ancestors.
Legal documents are sparse.
Coffman was a prolific poet.  There are clippings of poetry published in the Washington Post.  Some poems were published without his name.  Others have his initials, F.A.C., including two series of poems compiled in notebooks.  There are also unpublished poems.
There are certificates for scholarly and service awards and honors, and the registration certificate for the Marion Oat. There are not certificates for all the awards and honors listed on Coffman's resume.
There are just a few United States Department of Agriculture's bulletins and farmer's Bulletins that Coffman authored or co-authored.  The vast majority of Coffman's published research is not part of the collection.
One of Coffman's hobbies was photography.  There are hundreds of photographs documenting his personal and professional lives.  Subjects are wide-ranging. Coffman signed some of his photographs, mainly what he referred to as the "salon prints."  There are photographs taken by others including professional portraits and candid photographs of Coffman at various ages.  Many photographs are undated and unidentified.
There are seven scrapbooks containing photographs and memorabilia. 1) Photographs and memorabilia document a 10 day automobile trip to eastern cities and New England that Coffman took with his wife and daughter in 1936.  Expenses totaled $110.96.
2)  "The Farm" album contains photographs of family members, neighbors, friends, crops, farmhouse interiors and exteriors, Rocky Ford School, and Rocky Ford dam and mill.  The album is dated 1913 and some photographs are identified.  There are also approximately 56 photographs of Manhattan and Kansas State Agricultural College.  The subjects are the campus, buildings, classmates, lake recreation, train depot, street car, and a railroad bridge.  Some photos are identified and dated 1914.
3) This photo album with narrative is titled "The Many Faces of F.A.C." and is written by "A Couple of Norths and Shanghai Louis Kao."  It was compiled in 1962 and contains photographs of Coffman in various locations.
4) The album has photographs of Coffman's family and ancestors (earliest date 1884), Sunday school class, the First Baptist Church in 1902, Kansas State Agricultural College, and Manhattan.  There is extensive Kansas State Agricultural College memorabilia including a cadet corps certificate, 1908 fall term schedule, invitations, commencement programs, band programs, banquet programs, clippings and a baseball ticket.  The album also has correspondence and drawings.  The album has memorabilia from Coffman's transit back to the United States on the Shino Maru including menus and passenger list. There are photographs of the transit and memorabilia from a Hong Kong visit en route.  There are photographs of Kansas State Agricultural College, Oklahoma A&M and Akron, Colorado. 1916.
5) The Philippines album contains photographs of Coffman's trip across the western United States to board the S.S. Manchuria for transit to the Philippines.  Coffman photographed the Golden Gate Park,  the Panama Pacific International Exhibition grounds, onboard ship recreation, Honolulu, Tokyo, Nagasaki, the Philippines' countryside, Filipinos' daily activities, Philippine experiment stations, cultural activities, villages, Coffman's office and co-workers, YMCA sports,  Viscayia (German naval ship), Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kobe, Yamaa, Yokahoma,  the voyage back to the United States on the Shino Maru (not to be confused with the Shinyo Maru), Honolulu experiment station, Universal Film City, and the San Diego Exposition.  1914-1916.
6) The photographs and memorabilia in this album are compiled in honor of Coffman's brother, Will, who died in 1920.  It contains drawings, report cards, class schedule and photographs of Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, University of Kansas, and Will's travels. Loose commencement programs from Kansas State Agricultural College, 1913-1915, are with the album.
7)  The album contains photographs from Coffman's days in Akron and his travels to Amarillo, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Arlington, New York, Philadelphia and Mount Vernon from 1919-1922.  There is memorabilia from Washington, D.C., New York including a Metropolitan Opera House program and a Hippodrome souvenir book, Coffman's wedding and showers, and a program from the American Society of Agronomy 1922 meeting. Morrill, Kansas, Twin Oaks, Estes Park, county fairs, and Manhattan are also subjects of photographs.  Alta Johnson's School Girl Days: A Memory Book from Washington County High School, 1914, is boxed with the scrapbooks.
The most notable artifacts are four cameras, presumably used by Coffman:  Univex Model A, 1933; No. 1-A Kodak Junior Model A, 1914; No. 2 Folding Autographic Brownie, circa 1915-1916; Kodak Six-16 camera and leather case, circa 1932-1936.

Coffman, Franklin A.

Velma L. Carson papers

  • Collection
  • 1886-1986

The Velma L. Carson Papers comprises of correspondence, records, and photographs of her personal life, academic, and professional careers. The collection is divided into eight series: Manuscripts, Poems, Magazines and Published Articles, Correspondence, Photographs, Drawings, Biographical, Subject, and Artifacts.
The manuscripts of this collection contain scripts from plays, documentaries, and stories written by Velma Carson. Some of these manuscripts provide information regarding "Operation Democracy," a pageant called "Message to Feves," and orginal stories and essays written by Velma Carson. The poems in this collection are original poems written by Velma Carson about various topics throughout her lifetime. Magazines and Published Articles consists of newpaper and magazine articles and clippings from her life. There are also a few of her own publications and works that she published during her career as a journalist and writer. The largest portion of this collection is correspondence. This series is organized mostly in chronological order and consists of letters, cards, and postcards. The correspondence is mainly between Velma and her family and friends. The earliest letter is from 1915 and the latest is 1984. This covers her time at Kansas State in 1915 all the way to when she was awarded her degree in 1982. The photographs of this collection include a variety of photos of Velma Carson, her friends, and family over the course of her life. The drawings are several small pieces created by Velma Carson.  The biographical series includes nine folders of information on Velma, two folders of information on Winona Carson, and three folders on Viola and Edward Carson. The subject series is made up of four folders that include information on Belva Lockwood, Wayne Randall, Morganville United Methodist Church and Clay County taxes.  The artifacts include wallpaper and fabric samples, E. L. Carson's black leather wallet, stamps, a small toy monkey, a small puzzle, a copy of a Ten Dollar Confederate bill used as an advertisement for Joe Kay as Sheriff, and a Cigar Box.

Carson, Velma L.

Nels A. Tornquist papers

  • Collection
  • 1888-1950

This manuscript collection, consisting of approximately 450 items housed in one box. The material spans the years 1888-1950. Series 1, Military Papers (1898-1950), is the largest series and it is divided into the following sub-series: Spanish-American War, 1898; Cavalry Units, 1906-1915; Punitive Expedition Diary, ca. 1916; Letters of Recommendation, 1914-1919; Stateside Mobilization Camps, 1917-1918; Embarkation to France, 1918; Company Command in France, 1918-1919; 344th Labor Battalion Company Funds and Payroll; General A.E.F. Orders and Memoranda, 1919; Demobilization in France, 1919; Demobilization Camp in U.S., 1919; and, Retirement, ROTC and IRS, 1919-1950. Enroute to Namiquipa - U.S. Soldiers bathing, ca 1916 A Spanish-American War Roster and a roster of the 344th Labor Battalion (WWI) are interesting for their notations of names and addresses of the men who participated in these wars. The papers reveal the rapid promotion Nels A. Tornquist received after he was selected to command a black service company The certificates show that he was promoted from sergeant to first lieutenant in July of 1918 and then to captain the following month, just in time to take his new command to France during WWI. Among the activities documented in the papers during the time Capt. Tornquist commanded the black service company is a serious incident concerning large quantities of unexpended ammunition that the men in his company were expected to work around at their own risk. There are two folders in the collection that deal with the 344th Labor Battalion. One rare find in the collection is a war diary of the Punitive Expedition into Mexico after Pancho Villa, ca. 1916-1917. The comments on forage problems, climate and travel are noteworthy. Series 2, Personal Correspondence, is divided between that of Nels A. and Nels F. Tornquist. The father, Nels F., received all of his letters from his native Sweden so they are written in that language. The son's letters, fortunately for the Army censors during WWI, are written in English and are addressed to his step-mother Carrie. There are also many envelopes without the enclosures but they are useful for showing Tornquist's change of address as he moved from one unit to another throughout his career. Tornquist astride an Indian, U.S. Mobilization Camp, 1918 Series 3, Legal Papers, contains an original Kansas homestead deed for Salina, Kansas in 1888 and deeds for property in Washington state. Series 4, Certificates, indicate the official notification of each rank that Nels A. Tornquist achieved. A so included are notifications of retirement after 24 years of honorable service with the pre-WWI rank of sergeant; the notification in 1934 that he advanced to the retired rank of captain; and an undated memorial on behalf of the United States, signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Series 5, Printed Material, includes many souvenirs, train passes and army pamphlets from WWI. Of particular interest are War Information series pamphlets entitled, The War Message and the Facts Behind It, printed in June, 1917 and Treaty of Peace with Germany, printed in June, 1919. The remainder of the printed material is a mixture of wedding announcements, veterans organization membership cards, and incidental items. Series 6, is comprised of maps showing the progress of WWI and WWII. There is an excellent period map of Verdun, France which Capt. Tornquist personally annotated to show where he spent time prior to and after the armistice of November 11, 1918. 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 Approximately 61 photographs from the Spanish-American War, the Mexican border during 1916-1917 and WWI were filed in the KSU photograph collection, and several three-dimensional items were stored with the artifacts collection. A number of WWI and WWII maps were transferred to the Documents Department in the library. Of related interest is an oral history interview between Carl Rehfeld, the uncle of Nels Tornquist, and Evan Williams of Farrell Library. The tape and transcript are in the University Archives Oral History Collection.

Tornquist, Nels A.

Edna Worthley Underwood papers

  • Collection
  • 1889-1946

The Edna Worthley Underwood Papers (1889-1946) covers the period of her most active publishing. Underwood wrote original works of plays, poetry, prose, short stories and news articles. She also translated various author's works into English. She corresponded with many of the authors, often asking for a biographical sketch and a photograph. After 1938, not much is known of her life. She did not publish but traveled in the U.S.   The papers are contained in five document boxes (2.1 linear feet) and span the years 1889-1946.
They are divided into six series: 1)Correspondence, 1910-1944; 2) Literary Works, 1927-1938; 3) Individuals, 1918-1939; 4) Scrapbooks, 1905-1940, 5) Notebooks, 1889-1924; and 6) Printed Material, 1895-1946. Photographs have been transferred to the photograph collection of the University Archives.  Literary Works (1927-1938) is divided into several sub series.
Original Works contains works by Underwood; criticism of other authors; news articles on points of interest; notes; poems; prose; play, A Petersburg Night; short stories, "The Shudder of Don Giovanni", "Madame Dorette and Nature", and three untitled. The sub-series: 1) Translations, includes translations of short stories put into the book Flemish Short Stories; 2) plays, The Yellow Tent and Improvisations in June poems; 3) short stories, "The Van Helmers", "The Beggar Minar", "Tramp and Peasant", "Vaudrevil", "If Life is White", "Exile", "A Game of Chess", "Martha Timar", "Father, A Portrait", "The Trick", "Christmas Eve", and "The Wedding". Also included are original works by Aberto Zum Felde, Fernand Knopf, Robert Earl Underwood, and works by unknown authors. The last sub series contains miscellaneous items.
The series Individuals (1918-1939) contains folders on individuals that Underwood corresponded with and whose works she translated. The folders contain correspondence and original works of poetry and prose. The individuals include Max Dickman, Fabio Fiallo, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Luis Felipe Rodriguez, Daniel Thaly, and Cesar Vallejo.
The series Scrapbooks (1905-1940) contains three scrapbooks. Scrapbook #1 covers 1905-1939. It contains newspaper clippings, letters and various printed material. Scrapbook #2 covers literature of South America. It contains correspondence and original works of poetry. Individuals included are Julio Herrera, Xavier Abril, Carlos Wyld Ospina, Lartigau Lespada, Juan Borch, and Fernando Torregrosa. Scrapbook #3 contains correspondence and poetry from individual poets included in Underwood's translation of poets from Haiti. The poets include Emile Roumer, Clement Magloire, Maurice Casseus, Carl Brouard, Milo Riguad, Jacques Romain, Justinien Ricot, Jean F. Brierre, and Timothee Paret.
The series Notebooks (1889-1924) contains seven notebooks. They cover the time Underwood attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. These are handwritten notes from lectures. Notebook #5 contains prose written in 1924, thirty years after her graduation from the University. The last series, Printed Material, contains booklets, "El Pais Lilac", "Revista de Las Indias", "The Hobart Guild", "De Godsdienstige Keinst Van Rubens", "La Poesia Sorprendida", and "Requiem Por Los Muertos De Europa"; translations: newspaper clippings: and miscellaneous.
Twelve photographs were removed and filed in the University Archives photograph collection under the heading of Underwood. The photographs include Maurice Andre Casseus, Concepcion Monterrosa, Cesar Vallejo (2), Xavier Abril de Viver, Jorge Luis Borges, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Helery, Balleitein de Martin, and unknown.

Underwood, Edna Worthley

Bruce A. Adams family papers

  • Collection
  • 1891-2003

Bruce A. Adams Family Papers include genealogical and biographical information, educational records, military records, personal correspondence, and numerous photographs of Kansas natives Bruce A. Adams (KSU Class of 1969), George Earl Adams Jr. (KSU Class of 1948), George Earl Adams Sr., and their families. Of particular interest are World War II documents and photographs of George E. Adams Jr. who served as a reconnaissance pilot in Europe in 1944-45. The 31-year distinguished military career of K-State ROTC graduate Brigadier General Bruce Adams is well represented in the collection by a wide range of documents including three large photo albums that reflect in detail General Adams’ education, military training, military service, and personal life. The collection can be of interest to researchers whose scholarship focuses on twentieth-century American history, Kansans in the military, descendants of Seneca County, New York, and Atchison County, Kansas.

Adams, Bruce A.

David Schafer papers

  • Collection
  • 1892–2013

This collection features records from David Schafer who was a faculty member of the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry as well as the Faculty Senate at Kansas State University.  Many of the materials from the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry contain records from seminars, short courses, and instructional materials about proper food safety, processing, and meat handling.  Some of the seminars include Midwest Meat Processing, Angus Beef Round Up, and Kansas-Nebraska Processed Meats short course.  Almost all of these contain agendas and outlines for papers presented.  Other records included are articles, recipes, and course notes.  Many of the seminars contain information about food safety and meat handling, as well as tests, pamphlets, and coursework containing information and notes.  This information generally covers processing, packaging, and preparation of meat.  Courses contain diagrams of cuts and articles.  Food safety contains proper handling of meat, storage, and hand washing techniques.  The Angus Beef Round Up does contain photographs of a cow being butchered that some people might find objectionable.
Other materials in this collection are publications that cover a range of topics focused on meat, such as economic, production, health issues, and ethics.  Publications in the collection include newsletters, articles, magazines, newspaper clippings, magazine clippings, and several draft versions of articles.  The publications contain items from the Animal Science and Industry Facts newsletter that was published by the cooperative extension service of Kansas State University; this newsletter contains news and information about livestock.  Also included are articles about various kinds of food-borne illnesses, food preservation, and food poisoning.  Magazines include Animal Science and Industry trade publications, catalogs, and publications about food products and equipment.
David Schafer served on the Faculty Senate, including one year as the Faculty Senate President. Materials from his leadership role are featured alongside his professional documentation in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry.  His Faculty Senate materials include records from the Council of Chief Academic Officers (COCAO), Board of Regents (BOR), and Faculty Senate committee records.
There are cooperative extension video tapes and film along with continuing education about food and animal safety.  Finally, there is a recording of a Primetime Live broadcast that includes notes about how meat inspection is portrayed in the segment.

Schafer, David E.

Gavitt Medical Company papers

  • Collection
  • 1895-1928

Gavitt Medical Co. Records were donated to the University Archives at Kansas State University by Professor Charles Gardner Shaw in 1971. This collection is identified as accession number PC 1988.07.
This collection consists of correspondence documenting sales of the Gavitt System Regulator. The majority of the letters are requests to purchase the product, some detailing how they first received the product and giving glowing testimonials of how it helped them: <emph render='italic'>"It has cured me of a bad case of Catarrh and heart disease, and is commencing to give me strength."</emph> Other letters are inquiries about becoming agents for the company, explaining that either the correspondent is unaware of anyone selling their product in the area, or that the current agent is unable to continue to provide adequate service for the area.
Probably the most significant correspondence in the collection are the reports which the agents sent to the company's office in Topeka documenting the sales of the product. Many of these reports were penned on the back of the correspondence from the company, providing valuable insight into the times. The company letters include arguments for convincing the reluctant buyer to purchase their product: <emph render='italic'>"Many say they employ a family physician after they get sick. The graveyards are full of people who had family physicians called after they got sick. The time to take medicine is when the disease first makes its appearance and the only way to take it is to have it in the house handy at all times."</emph> The company also provides advice on marketing, suggesting that agents target parents with sons in the military: <emph render='italic'>"...we have not heard of a single case where the soldiers have had Malaria, Typhoid or Yellow fever where they had a box of our System Regulator sent to them."</emph>
Interspersed throughout the collection are personal letters from the Shore family and friends. These letters document the events in the lives of the family and the communities of Alma, Clay Center, Emporia and White City, Kansas, including births, deaths, and assorted gossip.
Of particular note is a letter from Jesse L. Shore to Kansas Secretary of State, George Clark, pointing out a error in the Session Laws of 1901, Chapter 420, and requesting that Mr. Clark check the actual bill to make sure it is correct. Mr. Clark's reply confirms that the error is in the bill as well and that the bill is invalid until the legislature meets again and can correct it.

Gavitt Medical Company

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