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Dan D. Casement Papers

  • US US kmk P1995.04
  • Collection
  • 1868-1953

This collection documents the writings, photographs, and published material in regards to Dan D. Casement (1868-1953), a cattleman and horseman, from 1858-1953. The materials included in this collection are a wide range of documentation, including a large amount of correspondence from 1858-1953 chronologically and notable alphabetical correspondence with individuals in addition to the U.S. Army and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Journals and diaries belonging to Casement give insight into his family, time at Princeton, and to his life in Costa Rica from 1897-1903. Specific information from the time he spent laying railroad track in Costa Rica and other life events during that time can be found in B4/F16 - B5/F25 and B22/F6-7. Casement wrote extensively for the American Hereford Association and many other livestock associations and organizations. Several articles, letters, speeches, resolutions, and fragments of other writings (poetry, quotations, letters to editors, etc.) are included within this collection. Supplementing these writings are press releases and various printed materials, including scrapbooks, letters, and newspaper clippings. Legal and financial documents from 1884-1941, including army vouchers, can be found in boxes 22 and 23. Other items in the collection are artwork, including pencil sketches, water colors, and awards/certificates, some oversized documentation and printed materials, and several photographs spread throughout the collection (boxes 1, 2, 7, 8, 14, 26).

Casement, Dan D.

Robert Simonsen Photograph Collection

  • Collection
  • 1955-2016

The Robert Simonsen Photograph Collection contains autographed photographs divided into 4 series: U. S. Political, U. S. Military, U. S. Protectorates, and International Leaders. The collection is split fairly evenly between the United States and International photographs, with the majority of the U. S. photographs residing in the Political series. Many of the autographs include an inscription and/or an accompanying letter. Unidentified individuals are first within each section.
The United States Political series is divided into three subseries: States, Ambassadors, and Federal Agencies. The States are arranged alphabetically with the individuals sorted alphabetically by name under their political division: House of Representatives, Senate, and State Officials. This is followed by United States Ambassadors arranged alphabetically within various year ranges, and United States Federal Agencies sorted alphabetically by specific department then arranged alphabetically by name.
The United States Military series is divided into four subseries by branch: Air Force, Navy, Coast Guard, and Marines. Within each branch the names are alphabetized under rank. Some ranks are entered multiple times under various year ranges.
The photographs in the United States Protectorates series are alphabetized under the specific place: Micronesia, Palau, Samoa, Northern Mariana Islands, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Trust Territory of the Pacific, Guam, and Marshall Islands.
The International Leaders series is sorted alphabetically by country. Some countries have all the individuals sorted alphabetically within a single grouping, while other countries will further divide the photographs into political and military subgroups. For example, the photographs for Argentina are all grouped together, while Australia is broken into 14 subgroups.

Simonsen, Robert A.

Doris and Leona Velen papers

  • US US kmk P2004.10
  • Collection
  • 1937-1962

The Doris and Leona Velen Collection contains materials pertaining to the sisters' campaign against the construction of Tuttle Creek Dam near Manhattan, Kansas from approximately 1937 to1962. The women were part of a large campaign of Blue Valley residents who attempted to save their homes from being flooded by the construction of Tuttle Creek Dam. Their efforts produced hundreds of letters, dozens of scrapbooks and pamphlets and numerous magazine and newspaper articles.
Subject files covering a broad range of topics relevant to Tuttle Creek Dam are assembled to complete the second series. Most notable among them are the files relating to the Blue Valley Open House, held October 22, 1955; trips taken by Blue Valley residents to Denver in 1952 and Washington D.C. in 1955 to meet with President Eisenhower; material used in political campaigns to elect anti-dam supporters to Congress; and the Tuttle Creek Story film, created to chronicle the creation of the dam.
The third series consists of speeches given between 1951 and 1955. Speeches were delivered before various groups and commissions in order to gather support in defense of the Blue Valley. The maps in the fourth series range in scope from local to national areas. Maps are used to illustrate how Tuttle Creek Dam relates to the other flood control projects along the Missouri River Basin. Various types of printed material are organized into the fifth series. Included among them are pamphlets and propaganda unique to the movement against Tuttle Creek Dam.
A large portion of this series contains newspaper clippings from various local and regional newspapers as well as an assortment of magazine articles. These articles provide a continuing narrative of the Tuttle Creek project, from its beginnings in the 1940s, through the controversy caused by its construction, and ending with the historic flood of 1993.
Scrapbooks created by Doris and Leona Velen make up the sixth and final series in the collection. The 69 scrapbooks span the years 1951-1962 and contain newspaper and magazine articles and congressional records concerning the Tuttle Creek project. A small number of broadsides, photographs, artifacts, and a 16mm film are listed at the end of the container list.

Velen, Doris and Leona

United States Commission on Military History records

  • US US kmk P2004.09
  • Collection
  • 1973-2002

The United States Commission on Military History records (1973-2002) contain materials pertinent to the operation of the USCMH and the International Commission on Military History. The ICMH is an organization of national organizations that comprises the USCMH and the national commissions of thirty or more countries at any given time. The ICMH convenes annually at a colloquium hosted by a different foreign commission. The bulk of material centers on the annual USCMH meetings and ICMH colloquiums. Reports, agendas, and minutes of USCMH meetings document the operation of the commission. Extensive correspondence and various files associated with the three ICMH colloquiums hosted by the USCMH in 1975, 1982 and 2002 contain detailed information about the accommodations, registration, itineraries, papers and publications necessary for each conference. The papers are divided into ten series: 1) By-Laws, 1974-1997; 2) Membership, 1973-1999; 3) Elections, 1973-1999; 4) Correspondence, 1973-2000; 5) United States Commission on Military History Meetings, 1973-2000; 6) International Commission on Military History Meetings, 1965-2002; 7) Financial, 1973-2000; 8) Printed Material, 1974-1999; 9) Other Historical Associations, 1974-2001; and 10) Audiovisual, 1972 and 1992. The By-Laws series contains the original articles of incorporation of USCMH in 1974 and consequent revisions of the organization's by-laws from 1975-1997. Also included are the by-laws and statutes of the International Commission on Military History. Membership information and data is assembled in the second series. Annual dues payments and registration data for USCHM is included as well as membership lists from both the USCMH and ICMH. All membership information is arranged chronologically from 1973-1999. The election series encompasses all aspects of USCMH elections. Every two years USCMH holds elections for president, vice-president, trustees and members of various committees. Materials within the third series include correspondence relevant to the nomination of officers, biographies of nominated persons, official ballots, and results of the elections. The fourth series contains general correspondence. The material is arranged chronologically and is separated between the USCMH and the ICMH. The material was left together as it was previously arranged and was not divided into categorical sub-series, except when already sorted by the donor organization. The majority of the contents are correspondence written to or by commission officers. Each year the USCMH holds a general membership meeting and a board of trustees meeting. Agendas and minutes of annual USCMH meetings as well as correspondence relevant to the planning and execution of meetings are included in the fifth series. Most notable among these records is the 1998 Report of the Long Range Planning Committee. The ICMH Meetings series contains information on the annual ICMH colloquiums. The colloquiums hosted by the USCMH and held in the United States in 1975, 1982 and 2002 make up the majority of the substance of the sixth series. Financial materials make up the seventh series. The USCMH functions as a not-for-profit organization and operated out of several different accounts. Annual financial reports and bills and receipts are filed chronologically from 1976-1999. Printed materials in the eighth series include USCMH bulletins and newspapers. Circulated to members monthly, the newsletters contain announcements, reports, and remarks from the current president and served as a means of communication to the general membership. Certain published material was removed from the collection and was catalogued for the main library. This included International Review of Military History, 1975-1992; International Bibliography of Military History, 1978-1999; and Proceedings from the ICMH Colloquiums, 1975-2002. The USCMH is affiliated with the American Historical Society and is listed in the AHA Directory of Affiliated Societies. The ninth series also includes information about a variety of other historical associations including newsletters, meetings, and conferences. The audiovisual materials make up the tenth series which contains audio recordings of the 1972 USCMH meeting and the April 15 and November 21, 1992 USCMH Board of Trustees meetings. Written records of the 1992 meetings are located in the USCMH Meetings series, however, no other record of the 1972 meeting exists in this collection.

United States Commission on Military History

Edna Worthley Underwood papers

  • US US kmk P1993.05
  • Collection
  • 1889-1946

The Edna Worthley Underwood Papers (1889-1946) covers the period of her most active publishing. Underwood wrote original works of plays, poetry, prose, short stories, and news articles. She also translated various author's works into English.
The first series, Correspondence (1910-1944), is divided into Personal Correspondence, letters from friends and admirers; Business Correspondence, letters regarding the publishing of books and reviews; Postcards; Telegram; Robert Earl Underwood's Correspondence; and a Letterbook, letters, and poems used for background information for her book of translation of poets of Haiti. The poets include Madame D. Viard, M. Leon Laleau, Victor Mangones, and Maurice A. Casseus. She corresponded with many of the authors, often asking for a biographical sketch and a photograph. After 1938, not much is known of her life. She did not publish but traveled within the U.S.  Photographs have been transferred to the photograph collection of the University Archives. 
Literary Works (1927-1938) is divided into several sub-series. Original Works contains works by Underwood; criticism of other authors; news articles on points of interest; notes; poems; prose; play, A Petersburg Night; short stories, "The Shudder of Don Giovanni", "Madame Dorette and Nature", and three untitled. The sub-series: 1) Translations, includes translations of short stories put into the book Flemish Short Stories; 2) plays, The Yellow Tent and Improvisations in June poems; 3) short stories, "The Van Helmers", "The Beggar Minar", "Tramp and Peasant", "Vaudrevil", "If Life is White", "Exile", "A Game of Chess", "Martha Timar", "Father, A Portrait", "The Trick", "Christmas Eve", and "The Wedding". Also included are original works by Aberto Zum Felde, Fernand Knopf, Robert Earl Underwood, and works by unknown authors. The last sub series contains miscellaneous items.
The series Individuals (1918-1939) contains folders on individuals that Underwood corresponded with and whose works she translated. The folders contain correspondence and original works of poetry and prose. The individuals include Max Dickman, Fabio Fiallo, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Luis Felipe Rodriguez, Daniel Thaly, and Cesar Vallejo.
The series Scrapbooks (1905-1940) contains three scrapbooks. Scrapbook #1 covers 1905-1939. It contains newspaper clippings, letters, and various printed materials. Scrapbook #2 covers the literature of South America. It contains correspondence and original works of poetry. Individuals included are Julio Herrera, Xavier Abril, Carlos Wyld Ospina, Lartigau Lespada, Juan Borch, and Fernando Torregrosa. Scrapbook #3 contains correspondence and poetry from individual poets included in Underwood's translation of poets from Haiti. The poets include Emile Roumer, Clement Magloire, Maurice Casseus, Carl Brouard, Milo Riguad, Jacques Romain, Justinien Ricot, Jean F. Brierre, and Timothee Paret.
The series Notebooks (1889-1924) contains seven notebooks. They cover the time Underwood attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. These are handwritten notes from lectures. Notebook #5 contains prose written in 1924, thirty years after her graduation from the University. The last series, Printed Material, contains booklets, "El Pais Lilac", "Revista de Las Indias", "The Hobart Guild", "De Godsdienstige Keinst Van Rubens", "La Poesia Sorprendida", and "Requiem Por Los Muertos De Europa"; translations: newspaper clippings: and miscellaneous.
Twelve photographs were removed and filed in the University Archives photograph collection under the heading of Underwood. The photographs include Maurice Andre Casseus, Concepcion Monterrosa, Cesar Vallejo (2), Xavier Abril de Viver, Jorge Luis Borges, Germaine Lassara-Bouchecourt, Coelho Netto, Helery, Balleitein de Martin, and unknown.

Underwood, Edna Worthley

Nels A. Tornquist papers

  • US US kmk P1984.18
  • Collection
  • 1888-1950

This manuscript collection, consisting of approximately 450 items housed in one box. The material spans the years 1888-1950. Series 1, Military Papers (1898-1950), is the largest series and it is divided into the following sub-series: Spanish-American War, 1898; Cavalry Units, 1906-1915; Punitive Expedition Diary, ca. 1916; Letters of Recommendation, 1914-1919; Stateside Mobilization Camps, 1917-1918; Embarkation to France, 1918; Company Command in France, 1918-1919; 344th Labor Battalion Company Funds and Payroll; General A.E.F. Orders and Memoranda, 1919; Demobilization in France, 1919; Demobilization Camp in U.S., 1919; and, Retirement, ROTC and IRS, 1919-1950. Enroute to Namiquipa - U.S. Soldiers bathing, ca 1916 A Spanish-American War Roster and a roster of the 344th Labor Battalion (WWI) are interesting for their notations of names and addresses of the men who participated in these wars. The papers reveal the rapid promotion Nels A. Tornquist received after he was selected to command a black service company The certificates show that he was promoted from sergeant to first lieutenant in July of 1918 and then to captain the following month, just in time to take his new command to France during WWI. Among the activities documented in the papers during the time Capt. Tornquist commanded the black service company is a serious incident concerning large quantities of unexpended ammunition that the men in his company were expected to work around at their own risk. There are two folders in the collection that deal with the 344th Labor Battalion. One rare find in the collection is a war diary of the Punitive Expedition into Mexico after Pancho Villa, ca. 1916-1917. The comments on forage problems, climate and travel are noteworthy. Series 2, Personal Correspondence, is divided between that of Nels A. and Nels F. Tornquist. The father, Nels F., received all of his letters from his native Sweden so they are written in that language. The son's letters, fortunately for the Army censors during WWI, are written in English and are addressed to his step-mother Carrie. There are also many envelopes without the enclosures but they are useful for showing Tornquist's change of address as he moved from one unit to another throughout his career. Tornquist astride an Indian, U.S. Mobilization Camp, 1918 Series 3, Legal Papers, contains an original Kansas homestead deed for Salina, Kansas in 1888 and deeds for property in Washington state. Series 4, Certificates, indicate the official notification of each rank that Nels A. Tornquist achieved. A so included are notifications of retirement after 24 years of honorable service with the pre-WWI rank of sergeant; the notification in 1934 that he advanced to the retired rank of captain; and an undated memorial on behalf of the United States, signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Series 5, Printed Material, includes many souvenirs, train passes and army pamphlets from WWI. Of particular interest are War Information series pamphlets entitled, The War Message and the Facts Behind It, printed in June, 1917 and Treaty of Peace with Germany, printed in June, 1919. The remainder of the printed material is a mixture of wedding announcements, veterans organization membership cards, and incidental items. Series 6, is comprised of maps showing the progress of WWI and WWII. There is an excellent period map of Verdun, France which Capt. Tornquist personally annotated to show where he spent time prior to and after the armistice of November 11, 1918. 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 344th Labor Battalion, World War I, ca 1918 Approximately 61 photographs from the Spanish-American War, the Mexican border during 1916-1917 and WWI were filed in the KSU photograph collection, and several three-dimensional items were stored with the artifacts collection. A number of WWI and WWII maps were transferred to the Documents Department in the library. Of related interest is an oral history interview between Carl Rehfeld, the uncle of Nels Tornquist, and Evan Williams of Farrell Library. The tape and transcript are in the University Archives Oral History Collection.

Tornquist, Nels A.

Russell I. Thackrey papers

  • US US kmk U1989.22
  • Collection
  • 1942-1987

The papers of Russell I. Thackrey were transferred from three file cabinet drawers into three boxes. Original order of the collection seems to have been alphabetical, although some parts appear to be out of sequence. The files have been placed in the boxes in the same order they were received. The papers reflect the post-retirement activities of Russell I. Thackrey. Most of the material is dated after 1970, although a few exceptions do exist. Earlier material consists of a few letters and articles between 1965 and 1970, and some letters with earlier dates filed in reference to a subject he was writing on. An example of such is within the Friends of Art File, in which letters and invoices concerning art bought in 1935 were filed among more recent materials. During their retirement years, Russell and his wife, Emily, relocated from Washington D.C. to Manhattan Kansas. From this location, he wrote numerous letters and manuscripts. The details of his career prior to 1970, which are not included in the collection, can be found in the Contemporary Authors, Volumes 37-40. The material present includes magazine articles, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, speeches, incoming and outgoing correspondence. Those represented in the collection were journalists, editors, members of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges, of which Thackrey was Director emeritus, personal acquaintances, and Government personnel. A few included in the collection were Bob Dole, Nancy Kassebaum, Jim Slattery, and John Carlin. Letters to Duane Acker, President of Kansas State University, 1975-1986 were also found. Thackrey had worked on an article about former Kansas State University President Milton Eisenhower (1943-1950), and parts of the manuscript were found. The main emphasis of Thackrey's work was education. He was extremely concerned with the rising cost of college, and the problems associated with students finding financial assistance. He also kept files on desegregation, educational organizations and Government generated ideas. His commentary on the Bennett plan is an example of his concern for Government plans. He advocated the lowering of tuition. Two photographs were removed from the collection and placed under the heading of Russell I. Thackrey. One was of himself, and the other photograph was of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges meeting.

Thackrey, Russell I.

Society for Military History Records Accrual

  • US US kmk P2008.03
  • Collection
  • 1933-2012

The Society for Military History Records (1933-2006) consists primarily of administrative and journal-related correspondence, organizational planning memoranda, and internal officer level reports. The original general arrangement of the records has been retained wherever possible. The majority of the collection is related to the preparation for annual conferences and the publishing of the organization's quarterly journal. The collection is organized into seven series: 1) Historic Papers, 2) Administrative Records, 3) Subject Files, 4) Journal Publishing Records, 5) Financial Records, 6) Printed Material, 7) Photographs. More detailed summaries of each series follow the scope and content section.
Originating as collaboration between the army's publications/historical research office workers and several Washington, D.C. area archivists, the organization, originally called the American Military History Foundation, was formed in an attempt to supplement the military's primary resource-poor collection in preparation to fight future wars. In time, the organization gravitated towards the scholarly study of American war fighting capabilities and public policy. Eventually, the organization grew into a multi-facetted society of scholars, military personnel, archivists, and military history enthusiasts, encompassing a dual foreign and domestic orientation, which encouraged a veritable kaleidoscope of traditional and non-traditional subject fields. Hence, this collection spans the history of the organization's different incarnations chronologically and by subject. These periods of change are reflected in their changes in name. They are the American Military History Foundation (AMHF), 1933-1939, the American Military Institute (AMI), 1939-1990, and the Society for Military History (SMH), 1990-present, respectively.
Their main publication, frequently referred to as "the journal" in documentation, has also changed names several times. They are The Journal of the American Military History Foundation (1937-1939/1940), Military Affairs (1939/1940-1988), and The Journal of Military History (1988-present), respectively.
The records also reflect the organization's involvement with other scholarly organizations, most notably the American Historical Association (AHA), the Organization of American Historians (OAH) and the United States Commission on Military History (USCMH), as well as their affiliation and later absorption of the veterans/historians association the Order of the Indian Wars (OIW).
Consequently, the strength of the collection lies with documentation concerning both the shifting needs of the general military, academic community, and the general public as well as the increased diversification of the military historiographic landscape due to the organization's non-profit efforts in both the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
The Historic Papers (1933-1972) series consists of (1) box of documentation, relating to the original goals of the organization, several early projects, certificates of incorporation, constitutions and by-laws, reports outlining the duties of officers, copyright information, taxes, early organizational correspondence between founding members, and agreements made with other organizations regarding membership and journal publishing, including the Order of the Indian Wars (OIW) and Kansas State University (KSU). Also found in the series are a few 1935 articles, published through Army Ordinance, which provided a mission statement, the creation of an organization beyond the Army History Division and served as the starting point for the organization's publishing arm.
The Administrative Records (1933-2007) series consists of (79) boxes of correspondence and reports circulated between the officers of presidential administrations, individual organizational members, the executive directors, and the boards of trustees. These files include such issues as membership drives, conference planning, journal publication evaluations, officer reports, and general correspondence. The papers covering the early years focus on daily administrative activities within a narrow scope of weeks and months. The papers covering the latter years of the organization span both daily material and long-range planning by the organization's officers. Many notable archivists and historians served as officers in the organization, including Trevor Dupuy, William Foote, B.F. Cooling, Russell Weigley, K. Jack Bauer, Alan Millett, Robert Berlin, Donald Bittner, Timothy Nenninger, Edward Coffman, and Edwin Simmons. Much of the correspondence and officer reports also shed light on several key events in the organization's history, including a 1940s attempted transformation of the journal towards a National Geographic-type format by Dallas Irving, the 1950s and 1960s performance of an all-volunteer editorial staff managed by Victor Gondos, Trevor Dupuy's late 1950 attempts to develop AMI into an increasingly scholarly organization, periodic evaluations of Kansas State University's journal publishing performance, the forces behind the creation of the Moncado Awards and the AMI/SMH Book Award, the search for a replacement publisher for the journal prior to the 1988 completion of KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 's contract, and reports outlining the sequence of fiscal/membership crises which nearly dissolved the organization. Similarly, the SMH papers of Donald Bittner collected in this series outline the entire process of conference creation from thematic conception to methodological process and management to the post-conference publication of several papers in the Marine Corps University's "Perspectives on Warfighting." Correspondence pertaining to several other noted military historians can also be found in this series, including material by Martin Blumenson, Victor Gondos, Brian Linn, Forest Pogue, Craig Symonds, Dennis Showalter, Robin Higham, Robert Berlin, and Bruce Catton.
The Subject Files (1908-1993) series consists of (11) boxes, containing a wide assortment of document-types from the organization's holdings according to topic and chronology. These files, originally retained separately from the general collection, were frequently utilized by different administrations as reference material for numerous policy initiatives described in other series. The set of records relating to the Order of Indian Wars contain both historic oral histories of the Plaines Wars and membership lists as a recruitment resource, which were incorporated into the organization when the Order of the Indian Wars merged with AMHF/AMI between 1938 and 1947. Other files contain biographical summaries of influential early members and journal contributors. Several files concern the drafts, correspondence, and memoranda on the reorganization of organization. Another collects the correspondence, submitted entries and judges description's for AMI's 1939 "Historical Fire Arms Contest." Still others include the efforts of several public relations to increase membership, membership paraphernalia, contractual agreements with other organizations, reports concerning the location and disposition of the AMI Library and Archives, federal tax-related forms, the history behind the Moncado Award, and one of the only successful 1960s Civil War commemorative events, the AMI Civil War Centennial Celebration.
The Journal Publishing Records (1933-1980) series consists of (13) boxes of correspondence, memoranda, reports, and papers submitted for publication by the journal. It covers the publication's many changes in name, editorial direction and format from The Journal of the American Military History Foundation (1937-1939) to The Journal of the American Military Institute (1939-1941) to Military Affairs (1941-1988), and, most recently, to The Journal of Military History (1989-present). The contents range from submitted manuscripts, such as "The United States Army Troops in China, 1912-1937" by Charles W. Thomas III (circa 1933), to editorial board-level material. Although originating in 1937 as the Journal of the American Military History Foundation, the majority of this collection was gathered together in the 1950s by Victor Gondos and served as the staff's institutional memory during his tenure as editor of Military Affairs. Researchers interested in business history and publishing will find the editor's daily correspondence particularly valuable, detailing the journal's on-going relationship with printers, advertisers, readers, reviewers, and prospective contributors. Another valuable resource includes the Cold War era's editorial board reports, which recorded membership/subscriber growth as well as managed printing venues, advertisers, subscribing institutions, and book reviewers. Other interesting subjects covered by the files include editor Dallas Irving's attempt to widen the journal's readership, the near dissolution of the journal in the late 1940s upon the resignation of the volunteer editor, the brief period in which the publication was maintained by the United States Army Office of the Chief of Military History, the 1949 attempt to rescue the publication by then-Columbia University President Dwight Eisenhower, the 1968 transition of publishing operations from a volunteer staff in the Washington, D.C. area to a paid professional publishing staff comprising Kansas State University's History and English departments and headed by Robin Higham, and a 1998 joint project with the United States Commission on Military History to publish an issue of Reveue Internationale D'Histoire Militair on the relationship between the United States Constitution and America's armed forces.
The Financial Records (1934-1999) series consists of (17) boxes of accounting records, receipts, officer reports, trustees meeting minutes, membership lists, and correspondence by subject and chronology. The first section of the records includes membership lists spanning the early years of the organization and the Cold War era AMI, detailing the status of active members, dues accrued, patrons, and honorary members as well as groupings of members by geographic region. Some individuals listed as members include George Marshall, Douglas MacArthur, Charles Summerall, Samuel Bemis, William D. Campell, Hoffman Nickerson, Hilario Moncado, Walter Lippmann, Milton Skelly, Bernard Brodie, Stephen Ambrose, and Harold Deutsch. The second section covers the accounting records of the early organization to the onset of the Second World War in the form of bank statements, bound ledgers, deposit slips, paid bills, and check books. The remainder of the collection covers the Treasurer and the Treasurer-Secretary's reports to the organization's officers, meeting minutes with the Board of Trustees, correspondence concerning member's status, investments, and bills to be paid. The financial arrangements made for joint conferences/seminars with other organizations are also interesting, including the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians, arrangements made for the organization's own annual conferences, and the early AMI Treasurer's financial reports concerning membership shortfalls after World War II and the Korean War.
The Printed Material series collects in (3) boxes maps, posters, and illustrations as well as copies of conference programs, newsletters, and some newspaper clippings. The first section of the series contains several black and white illustrations, printed in England, outlining the evolution of weaponry from edged weapons and armor to firearms, graphics describing officer ranks, two World War II era posters ("Careless Talk" and "5th War Loan"), maps of the United States, the world, and a handful of World War I battlefield actions. The second section holds several programs for SMH Annual Meeting events, membership directories for both the AMI and SMH for the years 1981, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1998, 2000, and 2002, respectively, and an eighteen year run of the Headquarters Gazette (1990-2008). The final section of the series includes newspaper clippings, featuring the obituaries of notable organizational members. A complete collection of Journal of Military History issues from 1994-2006 has been separated from the papers, catalogued, and shelved in the University Archives.
The Photographs (1940-2008) series collects in (1) box the miscellaneous printed images and portraits of the organization's members. Included in the series are portraits of several early organizational presidents and officers, black and white pictures of the 1968 Victor Gondos Testimonial Dinner, a photo of Victor Gondos at his desk, an assortment of images depicting naval vessels, aircraft, military personnel, and combat actions collected for potential supplements to issues of Military Affairs, as well as amateur pictures taken of SMH awards recipients and panel discussions held at miscellaneous annual conferences.

Society for Military History

Smith, Bottomly & Lill Family Papers

  • US US kmk P1987.10
  • Collection
  • 1832-1984

The Smith, Bottomly, and Lill Family Papers, 1827-1984, document four generations of a family. The collection focuses primarily on George Smith between 1827-72, to a lesser extent on his children and grandchildren (the Bottomlys'), and then increases in volume with the next generation (the Lills'), especially between 1934-45.
In the first series, journals and diaries, there are four items. Included in one of the journals is an interesting account of George Smith's trip from Iowa to Nebraska by wagon in 1865.
Correspondence (1828-1984), the second series in the collection, is housed in three document boxes and comprises the largest series in the collection. Items within the series are organized chronologically. The bulk of the items are the incoming and outgoing correspondence from 1934-45 between Percy and Helen Lill and their seven children, most of whom were either attending Kansas State College, preparing for military duty, or actively fighting overseas in World War II. Correspondence among family and friends, while the Lill brothers were attending K-State, describes student life. Also included in the collection are some letters by their mother, Helen Bottomly Lill, when she attended K-State from 1900-05. Perhaps the most significant items in the collection, however, are the early Smith family correspondence from 1828-41 because of its description of life in Vermont and the settlement of the Midwest particularly Iowa.
Contained in the third series, literary works, are speeches and essays housed in five folders. Although some of the works are undated, most were, apparently, penned by George Smith.
In the next series, education, there are a variety of items including diplomas, school programs, teachers' certificates, and grade cards. These items are diverse and cover the period from 1927-1953 and are contained in two folders.
The fifth series, medicine, contains a single item, a 1921 handwritten cold remedy.
The sixth series, Booth Association, is housed in one folder. This organization was formed on November 15, 1854, in New York by descendants of the Booth family of England, who claim to be the lawful heirs of the Booth family estates. Included in the materials are the association's constitution and by-laws, a membership fee receipt, certificate, and newsletter made out to George Smith, and a broadside removed to a larger flat box because of its size.
In the seventh series, financial documents, there are many items dating from 1837-1953; ledgers, receipts, bank statements, tax information, and related pieces. These materials are organized chronologically with the ledgers filed separately at the end of the series.
Genealogy, the eighth series, is separated by surname. There are some original handwritten items placed at the beginning of the series but most of the materials are photocopied, typed, or handwritten reproductions of original documents. These materials, contained in eleven folders, provide biographical information about the families.
The ninth series, printed materials, consists of Christmas and greeting cards, advertising cards, certificates, and miscellaneous items. These are housed in five folders.
The last series, photographs, are separated by family surname, specifically, or more generally, as family and friends. All negatives and tintypes are identified. Unidentified photographs are filed at the end of the series. Photographs of locations in Kansas, particularly of the campus at K-State, have been removed and placed in the University Archives photograph collection.

Smith, Bottomly & Lill Families

Save the Tallgrass Prairie papers

  • US US kmk P2002.02
  • Collection
  • 1971-1985

The three boxes contain correspondence, reports, brochures and flyers, newsletters, newspaper clippings, maps, financial and legal documents, and printed material in various formats created and collected by the Save the Tallgrass Prairie, Inc. (STP), 1971-1985. STP was formed in January 1973 "as an organization of concerned citizens who wanted to re-establish a small segment of the tallgrass prairie in as natural a condition as is possible." Its primary goal was to support legislation for the establishment of a Tallgrass Prairie National Park in the Flint Hills area of Kansas.

Save the Tallgrass Prairie

Victor and Alice Roper papers

  • US US kmk P2006.04
  • Collection
  • 1944-1997

The Roper Papers consists predominantly of photocopied letters from Victor Roper to his wife, Alice Roelfs, while he was participating in the European Theater of World War II. Victor ("Vic") and Alice were married only days after he was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant, and they were together approximately six months before he was shipped overseas. The collection contains facsimiles of 43 handwritten letters and two V-Mails from Victor to his wife while he was stationed in France, Germany, and Austria from January to June 1945. The letters depict a lieutenant’s life before, during, and after combat, as well as reflections on his past and his hopes for the future. The correspondence describes his trans-Atlantic voyage in January 1945, a period of anxious inactivity in France through February, intense combat in Germany in March and April, the end of the war in May while stationed in Austria, and the liberation of the concentration camp near Mauthausen, Austria. The letters contain mundane details of army life, including housing, weather, and food, as well the loneliness of a husband separated from his wife. The letters often discuss the frustration and uncertainty of wartime communications, as letters often took weeks to arrive. They are varied in mood and tone, reflecting the alteration between times of stress and rest. During times of combat, the letters are necessarily vague as to locations and actions, though details are frequently provided in subsequent letters and Victor's accounts of his time overseas are emotionally poignant throughout. The collection also includes a series of letters to Victor’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Roper, his aunt Clara Wesche, and Alice’s parents, the Roelfs. The facsimiles of 18 letters and one V-Mail to his parents cover the longest period of time, from January to October 1945, including his time in Belgium. Three letters are addressed to his aunt, and one to his parents-in-law. The Subject Series includes copies of various official and personal documents. Military Documents preserve Victor’s official service records, while Personal Documents contain important family papers. Printed Material includes a copy of The 65th Halbert Division Daily News Letter from June 15, 1945, as well as two programs from Army-sponsored church services. A second box of Printed Material includes original copies of wartime newspapers, including The Chanute News, The Stars and Stripes, and Yank: The Army Weekly. The majority of issues were published after the official end of hostilities. The Photograph Series contains 161 photocopies of personal photographs and postcards. Photographs are numbered in the order in which they appeared in the original albums. The pictures capture Victor and Alice in their youth in Kansas, his early military career in Mississippi and Alabama, and portraits of his friends in the service. The largest series of images, taken while Victor was stationed overseas, depict both the landscape of war-torn Europe, as well as casual life within the military. Some notable photographs include images of the Mauthausen camp following its liberation. The photographs have been scanned and digital images can be viewed upon request in the department until they are available through the KSU Digital Library. The documents are housed in two boxes. In the first box, the correspondence is arranged first by the addressee, then chronologically. Other materials are housed by subjects in alphabetical order, followed by the photographs, duplicated in their original album order. The second box holds additional Printed Material, placed in alphabetical order by the publication title.

Roper, Victor

Robertson Corporation records

  • US US kmk P2007.08
  • Collection
  • 1874-2009

The Correspondence Series is comprised of two boxes that extend over an 81-year period, starting in 1913 and ending in 2004 and arranged in alphabetical order. Majority of correspondence relate to the purchase of milling equipment such as elevators, dryers, flour packers, and sifters; the purchase of the Lemon Mill in Bedford, Indiana and the Ginger Feed and Elevator Company, Jeffersonville, Indiana; the sale of the company’s products such as corn meal, dog food, flour, livestock feed, and Glu-X; and the sale of the Seymour Mill. Correspondence between Phil Robertson and G. Terry Sharer, discusses historical milling machinery the Robertson Corporation donated to the Smithsonian in 1979. In 1980, Phil Robertson attended a reception hosted by the Smithsonian on the acceptance of the historical machinery. Equipment donated to the Smithsonian Institute.
The Financial Records are house in six boxes. Five boxes, 1928-2004, are filed in alphabetical order. They include annual meetings with statements of profit and loss, account ledgers, accountant's compilation report, auditors compilation report, balance sheets, cash flow statements, capital investments, estate transfers, financial statements, income tax basis, income tax returns, purchase orders from companies such as Advance Fabricators, Bearings Incorporation, Creason Corrugating, and Insects Limited, and sales and production figures. One box consists of the 1959 Ewing Mill appraisal, a Peoples bankbook, cash books, check stubs, financial ledgers, a payroll ledger from 1916 to 1917, production ledgers, sales slips, and a 1916 shipment register.
Minutes are stored in four boxes. (1960-1997, 2007-2009) are stored in two boxes and give insight on the daily, weekly, monthly and yearly goals of the Robertson Corporation. Each set of minutes contain travel plans, the price of crops on the market and a general overview of the company. There are two boxes of formal minutes in minute books (1960-2009).
The Subject Series (1874, 1881-2004) is the largest of all of the series. It is housed in nine boxes and contains insurance policies, newspaper clippings and class notes from when Joe E. Robertson attended Kansas State University in the 1940s. Listed alphabetically, the series covers the purchase and sale of mill property and equipment, contracts, events, feed and grain, flour standards, general milling information, history of the companies and employees, inventories, newspaper clippings, patent information, research, and one of the later important pieces of the corporation’s history: how the company eventually turned to Glu-X as a main product. Aerial view of the Ewing Mill in Brownstown, IN.
The Photographs Series (1900-2000) consists of four boxes of photographs and one box of glass negatives. It includes aerial views of the corporation, views of the mills, the after effects of a large snowfall, exhibits, and fires. Some of the photographs date back to 1900. This series is a picture book of change and innovation with photos ranging from horse and buggy to early automobiles, then on to large loading trucks. An interesting set of photos shows construction of the Ewing Blending Plant. With the photos in order, one can see each step of the construction from beginning to end. Not all photographs are business-related as there are family photos of each family member inside and outside the office. Notable family photos include a photo of Phil Robertson at the Smithsonian and photos of the Robertson's as boys and men.
Oversize Materials are stored in three boxes and includes newspaper clippings, Robertson Corporation abstract, loan application, mortgage, feed lists, equipment blue prints and printed material. Ewing, Indiana. Printed Material is the second largest series in the collection and is comprised of eight boxes. The largest section in this series is Articles that includes items from Milling and Baking, The Northwestern Miller, and Random Lengths. Brochures and pamphlets dot the landscape of printed material and include research findings from respected institutions or from attended research symposiums. Many of the magazine articles deal with World War II or the Russian grain embargo. There is also a collection of books pertaining to the history of milling and includes a copy of <emph render='italic'>The Robertson Corporation 1880-2000 </emph>written by R. R. Phil Robertson. Family member Richard S. "Dick" Robertson wrote <emph render='italic'>Recollections of My Life in Brownstown, Indiana</emph>, included in the collection. These recollections are snap shots of Dick's life in Brownstown. The Artifacts Series is stored in one box and includes flour slicks, commemorative coins, packaging bags for Glu-X and Triple-R dog food, and promotional items.
The Artifacts are stored within the department's Artifact Collection. Box 40 in this inventory lists the artifacts.

Roberston Corporation

Pillsbury Family papers

  • US US kmk P1988.20
  • Collection
  • 1948-1958

The Pillsbury Family Papers (1848-1958), contain a diary, a survey book, correspondence, literary works, research, and printed material. The papers, consisting of approximately 150 items, are housed in two document boxes. The papers are divided into six series l) diary, 1858-1860, 2) survey book, (1860); 3) correspondence, 1848-1958, 4) literary works, 1932-1940; 5) research; and 6) printed material. The major portion of the collection consists of material from Annie Pillsbury Young, daughter of Josiah H. and Alnora (Pervier) Pillsbury. The first and second series containing a diary (1858-1860) and a survey book (1860) of Josiah H. Pillsbury have significant historical information about his life in the Zeandale Township area, as well as his civil engineering pursuits. The copy of the diary has been translated by Mrs. E.M. Platt of Manhattan, Kansas, as it was in Isaac Pittman shorthand of 1850-60 period. The location of the original diary is unknown. The second folder contains page markers containing notes taken from the copy of the diary. Page numbers have been recorded on the markers for future reference. The diary of Josiah H. Pillsbury documents family history of the Pillsbury clan from 1858 to 1860 in the Zeandale Township area. Recorded are trials of illness and disease, weather hazards, and political turmoil of the period. Through the diary, however, Josiah H. Pillsbury remains a devoted family man, dedicated to preserving a community for which a family could be proud to reside. The work ethic was ingrained in him, as exemplified by being a carpenter, farmer, surveyor, newspaperman, political delegate, teacher, assistant clergyman, and postmaster, during his lifetime. Josiah H. Pillsbury was meticulous with numbers. The survey book (1860) has records of transactions for school, house, and fence building. A major portion is devoted to surveying for road construction into the Manhattan, Kansas area. The correspondence of the Pillsbury Family Papers is the third series in the collection. It is basically composed of letters of Annie Pillsbury Young, daughter of Josiah H. and Alnora (Pervier) Pillsbury. The time period ranges from 1848 through 1958. Mrs. Young was a prolific writer with numerous personal as well as business letters in the seven folders. Many of the letters involved correspondence with her sister Nellie on family concerns. Much of the business correspondence pertained to family genealogy. Folder four contains early letters dated 1871, Folder five contains typescript from 1848 to 1872, The location of the originals is unknown. Both sections give insight into the strong commitment to religion and family life of the Pillsbury family. Also, a firm belief that migrating to the Kansas area was the way of the future. Literary Works comprise the fourth series in the collection. Annie Pillsbury Young devoted time to writing essays and poetry. Some of the material appears to be partially autobiographical, such as "When Mother Was A Girl". She presented many of these writings to the newspaper for printing and to the literary societies' reading circles. The series, ranging in years 1932 to 1940, is contained in thirteen folders. The fifth series is devoted to research on the Pillsbury Family Biographical notes, as well as the personal accounts of Annie Pillsbury Young are incorporated in this section of material. The "Civic Center," in particular, should be of interest to researchers wanting insight into her father's dreams of success for Zeandale Township. Five folders house the research series of the collection. Printed Material is the sixth series in the Pillsbury Family Papers. This folder contains newspaper clippings, songs, and a brief excerpt about Josiah H. Pillsbury, by his son, Arthur J. Pillsbury. Four photographs have been removed from the papers and filed in the University Archives photograph collection. A list of the photographs is located after the container list.

Pillsbury Family

Page Family collection

  • US US kmk P2003.01
  • Collection
  • 1780-2004

The Correspondence Series (1834, 1845-1966) consists of twelve boxes and four sub-series.
The first sub-series are correspondence between family members and friends between the years 1834, and 1845 and 1966.  It consists of nine boxes and twenty additional file folders in box 10.
The second sub-series is Education and made up of one file folder.  Correspondence in this sub-series contains “pressure notes” to Olive and Mary Page when they attended Mt. Holyoke-Female Seminary wanting the twins to change their religious beliefs.
The third sub-series is Medical and is comprised of 33 file folders that contains correspondence that deal with Dr. William H. Page’s medical practice.
The fourth sub-series, Military, contains two file folders of World War I letters to Olive Page between 1918 and 1919.
The Art Series (1851-1852) consists of one cartoon that was created by Daniel Page when he was sent home from the Phillips Exeter Academy “because he did not know enough to enter the academy.”
The Cookery Series (ca. 1910-1920, undated) includes Mary Page Hastings undated manuscript cookbook.  This cookbook includes recipes for cream pies, feed for 40 hens and washing fluid.  Also in this series is a score card when Olive Page Rogers judged butter contests between 1910 and 1920.
The Education Series (1844-1929, undated) consists of school transcripts for Daniel Page from Phillips Exeter Academy, Florence Page from Newark Art School of Fine & Industrial Arts and Kingman Page from Bowdoin College.  Essays by Mary Page, Nina Page, and William Page are included.
The Family Series (1817, 1943-195[2], undated) consists of eighteen file folders. These folders include genealogical information, garden records, church membership, wedding gifts, funerals, marriages and school medical examination.
The Financial Series (1821-1948) is housed in fourteen file folders contains ledger books with minutes and legal information, receipts for payments to teachers, individual accounts, and financial documents pertaining to organizations and society pins.  A flat box includes an account book for pigs/hogs, horses, cattle, hens, sheep, wall paper for the Portland Street House, feed supplies, clothing, utilities, labor expenses, etc.
The Legal Series (1789-1947, undated) is comprised of real estate documents, deeds, a law suit that Alice Page filed against Daniel Page and Benjamin Page in the 1840s, and wills and estates.
The Literary Series (1823-1923, undated) consists of essays by William H. Page, Poetry by Beatrice Page, Mary Page Hastings and Minnie Hastings and Valentines to William Page and Huldah Page.
The Medical Series (1840s-1885) is made up of documents from William H. Page’s medical practice.  Items included are record books of patients, records of military recruits examined by Page at Boston during the Civil War, prescriptions, cures, and documents Page’s eye injury.
The Military Series (1861-1863) contains a discharge record book of Civil War soldiers from Massachusetts and New Hampshire.  This book provides the rank, company, regiment, state, residence, date of discharge, volume number and page number.
Printed Material (1839-1927) includes advertisement, announcements, annual reports, booklets about agriculture, medical, mining, silver ware and travel; a New Testament Bible belonging to Daniel Page; broadsides; calling card; invitations, and newspaper clippings.
Diaries Series (1854-1988) consists of 26 diaries.  The most prominent diaries in the collection were written by Nina E. Page, daughter of Dr. William H. Page, from 1911 to 1942.
Memo Notebooks Series (1874-1881; 1909; 1973; undated) is comprised of two Page family address books (1909 and 1973), an undated events book, and an autograph book.
Correspondence Series, Alphabetical, 1972-2004 and undated consists of correspondence to Carolyn Page and Roy Zarucchi and their business The Nightshade Press.
Correspondence Series, Chronological, 1834-1946 and undated is made up of handwritten correspondence between Page Family members.  These letters were not included in the original collection as Carolyn Page was using them for research.  This series also includes correspondence, 1847-1878 and undated, that are typewritten because they had been transcribed onto a CD.
Subject, 1851-2002 and undated, is comprised of information relating to some of the Page family members and information pertaining to The Nightshade Press such as press releases, poetry book reviews, and some authors who wrote for the journal.
The Financial Series, 1850-1947, is made up of Account and Note Books and financial information kept by Victor E. Page and Olive Page Rogers.  These accounts include prices of food, clothing and other household items purchased as well as crops and livestock bought and sold.
Legal Documents II, 1822-1912, consists of real estate records and deed, marriage records, wills, and estate records.  The most interesting items in this series are the wills and estate documents of Benjamin and Huldah Page.
Literary Works II consists of an incomplete manuscript by Carolyn Page titled <emph render='italic'>Homesteading in Desperate Times.</emph>  It was to be a book about the twins, Mary and Olive Page.  Mary married and moved to Missouri, while Olive taught school in Boston.  Often Mary wrote home asking Olive to send her old clothes so that she could sew clothes for her children.
Printed Material II, 1839-2000, includes articles, books published by The Nightshade Press, book reviews, hymn lyrics, The Nightshade Press journals from 1989 to 2000.
The Photograph Series consist of three (3) photographs: Daniel and Maggie Page, Dannie, Lilli and Nettie, and an unidentified person.
The Media Series consists of one Compact Disk (CD, undated).  This CD contains Page Family correspondence that has been transcribed.  Researchers should try to match the transcribed letter to the original handwritten if all possible for accuracy.
The Art Series II, 1930 and undated, consists of artwork by Carolyn Page, Anne Croom, Wilma Fulkerson, Ray Gengenbach, Florence Page Woodes, and Roy Zarucchi.
The Oversize Series, 1865-1889, 1986 and undated, is made up of three Physician Record books belonging to Dr. William H. Page and to Nina A. Page and some art work by Anne Croom, Ray Gengenback, Joe McLendon and Carolyn Page.
The Artifacts Series, 1889-1890, 1915 and undated includes a birthday card, calling card case, a medical prescription pad, two wallets – one black and one brown, and a wooden letter box.  There are also empty envelopes in this series that did not have correspondence attached.

Page Family

George Washington Owens papers

  • US US kmk P1988.18
  • Collection
  • 1875-1950

The Owens Papers (1890-1946) contain ten items consisting of a scrapbook, two diplomas, two certificates, and five photographs. They were donated to the University Archives by his daughter, Ana Elnora Owens. The scrapbook contains a handwritten autobiography (20 pages) and a "History of Agricultural Instruction in Virginia" (14 pages), both written in 1945-1946. Owens' autobiography describes his childhood in Kansas (near Alma in Wabaunsee County) and his experience at Kansas State Agricultural College as the first Black person to graduate from the institution in 1899. It provides a description of his employment at Tuskegee Institute after graduation where he worked under Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver. He left Tuskegee in 1908 to take a position at the Virginia Normal and Industrial School (Virginia State College) in Petersburg where he had a very successful career.
His writings describe the agricultural program at the school and his work in Virginia as the leader in vocational agriculture, including his organizational efforts for the New Farmers of Virginia that became the New Farmers of America. He provides an extensive list of others who were involved in vocational agriculture throughout the state. The two diplomas were awarded at the time of his graduation from high school in Wabaunsee County, Kansas in 1890, and Kansas State Agricultural College in 1899 where he obtained a bachelor of science degree in the "general course." The two certificates in the collection were awarded by Virginia State College. The first is a "Certificate of Merit" for ten years of service in 1945 and the second in appreciation for his teaching and service presented by the Alumni Association in 1946. Two of the five photographs show Owens as a student at KSAC in 1899 (one in his cadet uniform), two with his wife, Waddie Hill (a wedding photo in 1901 and another in 1903 with their newborn child), and one taken at the Virginia Normal and Industrial Institute in 1920.

Owens, George Washington

Alice C. Nichols papers

  • US US kmk P1987.08
  • Collection
  • 1914-1961

The Alice C. Nichols papers (1922-1962) contain correspondence, notebooks, tax records, book typescripts, drafts of articles, newspaper clippings and printed material. These items document the time in which Ms. Nichols established herself as a writer from the age of nine until her death in 1969, with special emphasis on the year 1954 when her most notable publication, Bleeding Kansas, was published.
The papers are housed in five boxes constituting two linear feet. The papers are divided into five series: 1) correspondence, 2) notebooks and notes, 3) financial records, 4) literary productions and 5) printed material. Each series is arranged chronologically.
The correspondence series includes the years 1942-1961. it contains both personal and business letters. The personal correspondence is generally congratulatory during the time Ms. Nichols wrote and published Bleeding Kansas.The business correspondence deals with magazine editors of Country Gentlemen, Men's Wear, American Home, Collier's, Ladies' Home Journal and Farm Journal with whom Ms. Nichols collaborated when she worked for the United States Department of Agriculture as food guide editor. The majority of the business correspondence is with Oxford university Press, publishers of Bleeding Kansas. Some notable correspondents include Milton Eisenhower when he was President of Pennsylvania State college and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Correspondents from Kansas include Robert Conover of the English Department of Kansas State College and the staff of the Kansas State Historical Society.
The next series, notebooks and notes, include notes for two literary works ("A Group of Joe Nelson" and "The Self Possessed"), geology notes, class notes, and notes taken from a meeting in Liberal, Kansas. Financial records, series three, are from 1947 to 1956. The contain U.S. and New York State income tax returns, profit shares from Western Printing and Lithographing, inc., a royalty account at Oxford university Press and the results of a trip to the Saratoga Racetrack.
The literary productions series is divided into five sub-series: 1) books, 2) photostats, 3) articles, 4) article summaries and 5) drafts. Two complete typescripts and one carbon copy are included in the books sub-series. The two books, both written by Ms. Nichols, are entitled D.A. Fay and One Destiny. Within the photostats are maps, newspapers and illustrations proposed to be included in Bleeding Kansas. The 27 articles are primarily children's short stories. They were written when Ms. Nichols was employed by Artist and Writers Guild, Inc.
The summaries of articles by Ms. Nichols include seven articles written about such topics as the Reformation, free will, letter writing, medieval church, and modern science. They were apparently completed just before Ms. Nichols' death in 1969. The drafts are hand and typewritten stories, predominately unfinished, with one finished work: "Heracitus on Essays in Optimism".
The series of printed material has five sub-series. The are 1) magazines and articles, 2) newspapers (Nichols Journal), 3) newspapers (originals), 4) newspapers (photocopies) and 5) miscellaneous. Magazines and articles are printed articles from the Century Magazine, each on a different topic, which Ms. Nichols used in her ten-year research process for Bleeding Kansas. The second sub-series contains one issue of The Nichols Journal, Ms. Nichols first publications. She published the small newspaper in Liberal, Kansas when she was nine years old.
The third and fourth sub-series (newspapers, originals and photocopies) cover the years 1947-1961. The highlight the publication Bleeding Kansas and include reviews, autograph sessions with Ms. Nichols and summaries of her book. Also included in the newspapers sub-series are articles about the history of Liberal and Ms. Nichols' parents. Cities represented among the newspapers are Chicago, San Francisco, Detroit and Atlanta.
The miscellaneous sub-series of publications houses such items as a bookjacket of Bleeding Kansas, a program from the Mid-America Regional Writers Conference held at Kansas State College and a briefing from the United States Court of Appeals, U.S. against James W. Elwell and Co., Inc. and Charleston Stevedoring Company, et.al.

Nichols, Alice C

Munger Family papers

  • US US kmk P2001.06
  • Collection
  • 1870-1936

The Munger Family papers documents three generations of correspondence within the family, on topics regarding their businesses, health, weather, and current events.

Part one includes correspondence between George Munger Sr. and his daughters Martha and Belle while they attended St. Mary’s in Notre Dame, Indiana. George Sr. corresponded with his wife, Susan while she was in the hospital for rheumatism during 1903. Other letters to George are from his father, Lyman Munger and his brother, Pliny Munger.

Part two is comprised of Belle Munger Riggle’s correspondence, which makes up the bulk of the collection. Letters between Belle and her husband, Edward, discuss business at Catalpa Knob and other places he worked as well as the welfare of their children. After Edward died in 1910, Belle married Irvin Hays Rice.

These letters provide historical information about the locations they were written from, which include Kansas, Illinois, California, and Indiana. Topics covered include business and economic matters, social and cultural life, family relationships, and conditions of the United States during the span of this collection.

Munger, George Merrick

Charles L. Marshall Sr. papers

  • Collection
  • 1911–2004

The Charles L. Marshall Sr. papers primarily document his involvement in promoting art in Kansas through his association with several art organizations in the state and at Kansas State University. Materials in this portion of the collection include correspondence, newsletters, reports, meeting information, printed materials, and newspaper clippings. Additional portions of the papers document examples of his artwork and touch on his time as an architect in the state.
he predominant correspondence deals with his involvement in the KSFA and includes originals, carbon copies, and photocopies.  Marshall corresponded with John F. Helm, Jr., Mildred E. Hunter, Francis David Farrell, Russell Thackrey, James McCain, Birger Sandzen (photocopies only), Charles Stroh, Don Louthian, Herschel C. Logan (photocopies only), Ward Lockwood, Charles B. Rogers, Bernard (Poco) Frazier (photocopies only), Zona Wheeler, Oscar Larmer, Bruce Reed, J. Cranston Heintzelman, Dorothy Barfoot, Mrs. Charles Sanderson, Priscilla Pastrick, Joy Jacobs, and Peggy Greene. A 1963 biographical sketch of Marshall is included, as are personal notes, receipts for paintings, newspaper clippings, and exhibition booklets.
The KSU Friends of Art series primarily covers the time period of 1982–1990. Correspondents include Mandy Doolittle, Jessica Reichman, and Charles Stroh. Also included are Friends of Art newsletters and an Executive Committee Report (1985–1986). The printed material (1950–1990) contains flyers, an invitation, and biographies of Evan Lindquist and Edward Starr.
The Kansas State Art Center series deals with the campaign for an art museum at KSU covering the years 1963 to 1991.  It consists primarily of correspondence with Charles Stroh, Jon Wefald, Jerome Frieman, Gilbert E. Johnson, Mrs. John F. Helm, Russell Thackrey, John F. Helm, John E. Brink, Raymond Spilman, Kenneth M. Heywood, and Larry Weigel.  It contains notes, a proposal for the art museum, minutes from the board of directors with a worksheet to augment the brochure A New Resource, art center foundation and committee meetings, an executive report, and art center fund report. Printed materials include newspaper clippings, a page from the K-Stater printer's copy of the flyer for KSU art center and foundation contributions, a copy of the flyer never mailed, and a suggested program for the proposed art center are contained in the printed material section. Several booklets were also included: Summary of Fund Raising Survey Report for Washburn, The Need for an Art Center at Kansas State University, and A New Resource at One of the Cultural Crossroads of Kansas.
The Kansas State Federation of Art series is the largest in the collection and covers the years 1940–1985. It deals with Marshall's time as trustee, president, and board member and extends up to the disbanding of the KSFA.  It contains correspondence with J. Cranston Heintzelman, Robert W. Cooke, Winston A. Schmidt, Ronald L. Reid, Margaret Pelham Greenough, Oscar Larmer, Gordon Zahradnik, Sue Jean Boys, Dan F. Howard, Margaret Hammel, Don Smischny, Margo Kren, Mary Wing, Donna Foster, Zona Wheeler, and Daniel E. Bernard.  This series also contains general information about the organization, by-laws, and two bank statements (1973 and 1976). Meetings, membership lists, bulletin of exhibits, and other exhibition information make up the rest of this series.
The Kansas Society of Artists series covers the time period of 1957 to 1960.  It deals with the Society and Marshall's involvement.  It contains membership lists, minutes, and correspondence with J. Cranston Heintzelman, John F. Helm, Jr., and William Dickerson.
The Zona Wheeler series is made up of photocopies of her files covering the years 1943 to 1978.  It contains correspondence from Ronald L. Reid, Judy Reid, Evelyn A. De Graw, J. Cranston Heintzelman, and John F. Helm, Jr.  It also contains exhibition lists.
Additionally, there is one envelope of negatives documenting some of Marshall's time as a K-State student in the 1920s. Included are social situations and Roughneck Days.
Three folders include materials mostly from Charles L. Marshall, Sr., including copies and original sketches and artwork, clippings, exhibit publications, property deed, 1987 booklet Let’s Start from Scratch and 1979 booklet Thumbnail’s by Marshall, death certificate, funeral services program, KSC engineers’ open house button, KSC Air Force ROTC patch, 1954 Royal Purple, and photos. The latter three items are from when Charles L. Marshall, Jr., attended K-State. Photos include the elder in a 1923 ROTC uniform, as child and adult, Ahearn Field House construction, 1951 basketball game, and on project sites.

Marshall, Charles L.

Gavitt Medical Company papers

  • US US kmk P1988.07
  • Collection
  • 1895-1928

Gavitt Medical Co. Records were donated to the University Archives at Kansas State University by Professor Charles Gardner Shaw in 1971. This collection is identified as accession number PC 1988.07.
This collection consists of correspondence documenting sales of the Gavitt System Regulator. The majority of the correspondence pertains to purchasing the product, some detailing how they first received the product and giving glowing testimonials of how it helped them: "It has cured me of a bad case of Catarrh and heart disease, and is commencing to give me strength." Other letters are inquiries about becoming agents for the company, explaining that either the correspondent is unaware of anyone selling their product in the area, or that the current agent is unable to continue to provide adequate service for the area.
Probably the most significant correspondence in the collection is the reports which the agents sent to the company's office in Topeka documenting the sales of the product. Many of these reports were penned on the back of the correspondence from the company, providing valuable insight into the times. The company letters include arguments for convincing the reluctant buyer to purchase their product: "Many say they employ a family physician after they get sick. The graveyards are full of people who had family physicians called after they got sick. The time to take medicine is when the disease first makes its appearance and the only way to take it is to have it in the house handy at all times." The company also provides advice on marketing, suggesting that agents target parents with sons in the military: "...we have not heard of a single case where the soldiers have had Malaria, Typhoid or Yellow fever where they had a box of our System Regulator sent to them."
Interspersed throughout the collection are personal letters from the Shore family and friends. These letters document the events in the lives of the family and the communities of Alma, Clay Center, Emporia and White City, Kansas, including births, deaths, and assorted gossip.
Of particular note is a letter from Jesse L. Shore to Kansas Secretary of State, George Clark, pointing out a error in the Session Laws of 1901, Chapter 420, and requesting that Mr. Clark check the actual bill to make sure it is correct. Mr. Clark's reply confirms that the error is in the bill as well and that the bill is invalid until the legislature meets again and can correct it.

Gavitt Medical Company

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